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Dr. Jonathan King Barlow and Honor Douglas

Sources: Edson Barlow, Ancestry, Barlow Genealogy, Rootsweb World Connect, Wikipedia, Tombstones from Norma Zimmerman and Find-a-Grave, with several links to documents relating to this family.     Most images are thumbnails and may be enlarged by clicking on it.
1.
DR. JONATHAN KING BARLOW, son of Nathaniel Barlow and Betsy King, and grandson of Aaron Barlow and Mary Nye, was born 29 May 1789 in Barnard, Windsor Co Vermont, and died 23 July 1849 in Melrose, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.   Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman.

He married HONOR DOUGLAS on 20 October 1814. The daughter of Benajah Douglas and Martha Arnold, [and aunt to Stephen Arnold Douglas] she was born 03 September 1796 in Brandon, Rutland Co Vermont, and died 05 August 1849 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois. Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman                   Barlow Plot at Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois
1830, Bethany, Genesee Co New York:  Jonathan K. Barlow:   Census Image
1 wm 5<10      1 wm 10<15      1 wm 60<70     /    1 wf <5  3 wf 5<10     1 wf 40<50    According to the dates provided for his children, in 1830, he would be 41, his sons, 14, [Stephen] 10 [Jonathan Jr.] and 4 [William R.] years old, Honor would be 34, with daughters 6, [Elizabeth] 4, [Martha] 3, and 2 [Martha Louise] years old. Thus, I do not believe this to be his family.  More likely it is Jonathan Barlow in Middlebury, Addison Co Vermont:   1 wm <5    2 wm 10<15    1 wm 40<50    /  1 wf <5  1 wf 5<10   1 wf 20<30 1 wf 30<40      Census Image
Neither completely fits the ages given for the children, but this one comes closer.    But again, the NY census gives the middle initial K.
I was unable to determine where Jonathan lived in 1840.  Jonathan in Schnectady, Orleans, and Allegany Co NY, and a John in Adams Co Illinois.
Children of Jonathan Barlow and Honor Douglas are:
2 i.
STEPHEN ARNOLD DOUGLAS BARLOW2, born 04 February 1816 in Middlebury, Addison Co Vermont, and died 08 August 1895 in St. Louis, St Louis Co Missouri.
ii. WILLIAM J. BARLOW, born 1818, and died 1826.  [From Edson Barlow records]
iii. JONATHAN KING BARLOW, JR., born 1820. 
iv. GEORGE RENALDO BARLOW, born 1822, and died 1826. 
v.
ELIZABETH H. BARLOW, born 17 June 1824 in Genesee Co New York, and died 1891, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
She married 1)  MR. EASTLAND?   I was unable to locate any records to prove this, other than researchers show Philo's 2nd wife to be Elizabeth H. Eastland.  I was unable to locate a census record to verify them either.
She married 2) PHILO ASHLEY GOODWIN on 19 November 1855 in Illinois.   The son of of Hezekiah Goodwin and Hannah A. Kingsbury, he was born 18 May 1807 in Bloomfield, Hartford Co Connecticut, and died in 12 June 1873.  He had previously been married to Lavinia Harvey.  
1860 Quincy Adams Co Illinois:  Philo A. Goodwin, 53, CT, and Elizabeth Goodwin, 50, NY. Her age must be in error.
1870 Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, P.A. Goodwin is 62, born in Vermont, and Elisabeth is 45, born in NY. 3 servants are in the home, but no children.
1880 Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, Elizabeth H. Goodwin is living with her nephew, Henry B. Volk, she is a widow, age 56.
Quincy and Adams Co History and Representatives, 1919 says of Philo:  Philo A. Goodwin, a Connecticut man, located at Quincy about 1840 and practiced his profession there until his death in June, 1873. He was a sound lawyer and a good citizen.
Past and Present of Adams Co:  Philo A. Goodwin was a native of Connecticut, whence he came west and he resided in Quincy nearly a third of a century. He died June 13, 1873: Mr. Goodwin had a profound respect for his profession, was a good lawyer, a safe counsellor, a warm hearted friend and an honest man.
Perhaps this is the same:  Biography of Andrew Jackson: President of the United States, formerly major general in the Army of the United States, by Philo Ashley Goodwin, Esq.  © 1836
vi.
WILLIAM R. BARLOW, born c1826 in New York, and died 1849 in Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
vii. MARTHA BARLOW, born 1827 in New York, and died 1833.  [This from Edson Barlow records - but why would they name 2 daughters Martha?]
3 viii. MARTHA LOUISE BARLOW, born September 1828 in New York, and died after June 1900, probably in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.
ix.
MARY CORNELIA BARLOW, born 1830 in New York, and died 10 August 1853 in Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois. Tombstone photo by Norma Zimmerman.   She was living with sister, Martha Volk in the 1850 census, age 18, unmarried.
She married NATHANIEL HERRICK on 28 November 1850 in Adams Co Illinois.    A tombstone found in the Woodland Cemetery for Mattie Herrick appears to be the infant daughter of Nathaniel and Mary Herrick. Tombstone photo by Norma Zimmerman
4 x.
EMILY CLARRISA BARLOW, born 23 August 1832 in New York, and died 28 May 1897, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois
5 xi. JOSEPH CHOTEAU BARLOW, born 1836 in Bethany, Genesee Co New York, and died 1895 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.
A tombstone in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois that is illegible except the name Barlow and a death date of 06 November 1894, is undoubtedly a member of this Barlow family.
GENERATION 2
2.
STEPHEN ARNOLD DOUGLAS BARLOW2, (Jonathan1) was born 04 February 1816 in Middlebury, Addison Co Vermont, and died 08 August 1895 in St. Louis, [independent city] Missouri, burial in Bellfontaine Cemetery, St. Louis Missouri.      Burial Certificate    Death Record 

He married LUCY ANN DICKSON on 12 September 1839 in New York.   She was born March 13, 1822 in New York and died October 27, 1895?, burial along with Stephen in Bellfontaine Cemetery, St. Louis Missouri.     Tombstone Photo 1    Tombstone Photo 2 
Found at Find-a-Grave.com, no source given:
Born in Vermont, Barlow was educated mainly in New York, completing his education at the Wesleyan Seminary. He read law in the office of a prominent attorney in Batavia, New York and was admitted to the bar in 1839. That same year he came to St. Louis and soon appointed assistant to General John Ruland, clerk of the Circuit Court of St. Louis County. Three years later he was made chief deputy to James Walsh, clerk of that court. Two years after that, the county court appointed him county clerk and recorder of deeds to fill out the unexpired term of a deceased official. In 1847 he was elected to that office. While serving as a county official, he had also been active in promoting railway and other enterprises of important to St. Louis. Then in 1853, the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company was permanently organized and he was made its secretary and treasurer. Upon the expiration of his term as clerk and recorder he turned his entire attention to railroad affairs, becoming president of the railroad company in 1859. For seven years thereafter he remained at the head of this corporation, and was known as one of the ablest of the old-time Western railway managers. In 1868 the Iron Mountain Railroad and its franchises were sold and a reorganization of the company followed. For a few years thereafter Mr. Barlow was not officially identified with the corporation. However, in 1873, he resumed connection with it as assistant to the president. Later he became local treasurer and eventually secretary of the Iron Mountain branch after consolidation with the Missouri Pacific system. As early as 1857 he served as a member of the Board of Public Schools, and was re-elected several times. As its president he contributed greatly to the building of the public school system of St. Louis. During the years 1865-6, while a member of the Missouri Legislature, he obtained a charter for the Public School Library Association, which founded the present public library, and was its first president. In 1867, he served as a member of the Board of Water Commissioners of St. Louis, and in 1869 was elected city comptroller, serving until 1871. While acting in that capacity, he formulated the “Cole-Barlow Charter,” which was enacted by the Legislature. After the adoption of the existing “scheme and charter” he was elected a member of the first city council provided for therein and served until 1879, being chairman of the committees on ways and means, and railroads. He was originally a Whig in his political affiliations, but later joined the “Free Soil” movement, being one of the small number of Missourians who took a bold stand against the extension of slavery. He later became a supporter of the Republican party.
Encyclopedia of the history of Missouri: a compendium of history ..., Volume 1, edited by Howard Louis Conard

Barlow, Stephen Douglas, distinguished as railway official and public man, was born in Middlebury, Vermont, February 4, 1816, and died in St. Louis August 8, 1895. His father was Jonathan K, Barlow, member of a New England family, which has numerous eminent representatives. His mother was Miss Honor Douglas before her marriage, and was an aunt of the late distinguished Illinois Senator and statesman, Stephen A. Douglas. Reared mainly in New York State, Stephen D. Barlow obtained his early education in the common schools of Genesee County, and completed his education at the Wesleyan Seminary, near Rochester, New York. He read law in the office of a prominent attorney of Batavia, New York, and was admitted to the bar in 1839. The same year he came to St. Louis, arriving on November 12th. Shortly afterward he was appoined assistant to General John Ruland, clerk of the Circuit Court of St. Louis County, and in 1842, after the creation of the Court of Common Pleas, he was made chief deputy to James W. Walsh, clerk of that court. Two years later the county court appointed him county clerk and recorder of deeds to fill out the unexpired term of a deceased official. In 1847, he was elected to this office by the people, and in 1848 entered upon a six years term, which expired in 1854. While serving the people with consipicuous ability as a county official, he had also been active in promoting railway and other enterprises of importance to the city, and when, in 1853, the St. Louis & Iron Mountain Railroad Company was permanently organized, he was made its secretary and treasurer. Upon the expiration of his term as clerk and recorder he turned his entire attention to railroad affairs, and by successive re-elections continued in the position of secretary and treasurer of the railroad company until 1859 when he became president.
For seven years thereafter he remained at the head of this company and was known as one of the ablest of the old-time Western railway managers. When the Iron Mountain Railroad and its franchises were sold to satisfy a claim which the State of Missouri held against it for aid rendered to the enterprise. A reorganization of the company followed this sale, and for a few years thereafter Mr. Barlow was not officially identified with the corporation. In 1873, however, he resumed connection with it as assistant to Honorable Thomas Allen, president. Later he became local treasurer of the company, and after the purchase of the road by Jay Gould in 1878, which resulted in its consolidation with the Missouri Pacific system, he was retained as secretary of the Iron Mountain branch and commissioner of lands in Missouri. Both these offices he continued to hold until the day of his death. During his long and active connection with the railway interests of Missouri he was much in the public eye, and in that sense was a public iruiti for more than forty years. As a city and county official he also rendered many years of faithful and efficient service to the people, and the force and influence of his constructive genius was felt in almost every department in the city government. As early as 1857 he served as a member of the Board of Public Schools, and was several times re-elected to that body. As its president particularly he contributed greatly to the upbuilding of the splendid public school system of St Louis. During the years 1865-6, while a member of the Missouri Legislature, he obtained a charter for the Public School Library Association which founded the present public library. He was its first president. In 1866 he was appointed a member of the board of managers of the State Asylum for the Insane, at Fulton, Missouri. In 1867-8 he served as a member of the Board of Water Commission of St. Louis, and in 1869 was elected comptroller, serving until 1871. While serving in that capacity he formulated the "Cole-Barlow charter," which was enacted by the Legislature. After the adoption of the existing "scheme and charter" 'he was elected a member of the first city council provided for therein, and served until 1879, being chairman of the committees on ways and means, and railroads. He was originally a Whig in his political affiliations, but early joined the "Free Soil" movement, being one of the small number of Missourians who took a bold stand against the extension of slavery. He naturally became a supporter of the Republican party, and was a steadfast but conservative member of it to the end of his life. From 1842 until his death he was a member of St. John's Episcopal Church of St. Louis, and during the later years of his life was senior warden of its vestry. September 12, 1839, he married Miss Lucy A. Dickson, of Perry, New York. His widow and four children are the surviving members of his family. These children an. Stephen D. Barlow, Margaret D. Turner, wife of Charles H. Turner, president of the St. Louis & Suburban Railway Company; Agnes Houser, wife of D.M. Houser, president of the Globe Printing Company and publisher of the St. Louis "Globe-Democrat"; and Andrew D. Barlow, present United States consul general in Mexico.
09 October 1850, St Louis, St Louis Missouri   pg 319b  #648/659:  Stephan D. Barlow, 34, VT, Lucian Barlow, 26, NY, Lucy Ann Barlow, 10, NY, Stephan D. Barlow, 5, MO, Margaret Barlow, 1, MO, Emily Barlow, 19, NY, and 6 boarders            Census Image
25 July 1860, St Louis, Ward 1, St Louis Missouri   pg 532   #1940/4337:   S.D. Barlow, 44, VT, Louisa A. Barlow, 38, NY, Louisa A. Barlow, 19, MO, Stephen D. Barlow, 15, MO, Margareth Barlow, 11, MO, Agnes Barlow, 1 mo, MO, and 4 boarders    Census Image 1    Census Image 2
06 July 1870, St Louis, Ward 3, St Louis Missouri   pg 57b   #678/832:   Stephen D. Barlow, 54, VT, Lucy Ann Barlow, 45, NY, Stephen D. Barlow, 25, MO, Maggie Barlow, 20, MO, Andrew D. Barlow, 7, MO, Agnes Barlow, 10, MO, and 2 boarders    Census Image
07 June 1880, St Louis, St Louis Missouri   pg 390a   #925/130/149  [Rejected census]   S.D. Barlow, 60, VT, VT, VT, Lucy Barlow, wife, 50, NY, NY, NY, Stephen D. Barlow, son, 35, MO, Agnes Barlow, daughter, 20, MO, Andrew Barlow, son, 17, and 2 servants   Census Image
08 November 1880, St Louis, St Louis Missouri   pg 440c   #11/11:   Stephen D. Barlow, 64, VT, VT, VT, Lucy W. Barlow, wife, 58, NY, NY, NY, Stephen D. Barlow, Jr., 37, St Louis, Agnes Barlow, daughter, 19, St Louis, A. Dickson Barlow, son, 17, St Louis and 2 servants     Census Image
Children of Stephen Barlow and Lucy Dickson are:
6 i.
STEPHEN DOUGLAS BARLOW, JR.3. born June 1845 in St. Louis Missouri, and died 17 February 1917 in Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois, burial in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois.
7 ii. MARGARET 'MAGGIE' DICKSON BARLOW, born cOctober 1849 in New York. 
8 iii.
AGNES BARLOW, born 1861 in St Louis Missouri, and died 12 May 1907 in St. Louis Missouri.
iv. ANDREW DICKSON BARLOW, born c1863 in St Louis Missouri.  I did not locate him after the 1880 census.
 
3.
MARTHA LOUISE BARLOW2, (Jonathan1), was born September 1828 in New York, and died 1903 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman

She married CORNELIUS G. VOLK on 08 June 1845 in Bethany, Genesee Co New York.  The son of Garrett Volk and Elisabeth Gestner, he was born 1822 in New Jersey, and died 1898 in Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
Cornelius was a sculptor and an older brother of Leonard Wells Volks, who was also a sculptor, and married Martha's sister, Emily.   Among Cornelius work is a statue of Illinois' 12th Governor John Wood.  It was donated by the people of Quincy, Wood's hometown, and is on the second floor of the Illinois State Capitol.
Cornelius registered for the Civil War in June 1863 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, at the age of 41, showing his birthplace as NY, see line #14
22 August 1850, Quincy, Middle Ward, Adams Co Illinois  pg 238a   #106/113:  Cornelius G. Volk, 27, NJ, Martha L. Volk, 20, NY, Henry B. Volk, 4, NY, Mary C. Barlow, 18, NY         Census Image
18 June 1860, Quincy, Ward 2, Adams Co Illinois   pg 80  #540/574:   Cornelius G. Volk, 37, NJ, Martha L. Volk, 31, NY, Henry B. Volk, 13, NY, Cornelius G. Volk, Jr., 1, IL     Census Image
29 July 1870, Quincy, Ward 2, Adams Co Illinois   pg 456a  #112/124:  C.G. Volk, 47, NJ, Martha Volk, 42, NY, Cornelius Volk, 12, IL, Mary Park, servant girl, 18, TN     Census Image
01 June 1880, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois   pg 589c  #1/1:  Cornelius G. Volk, 47, NJ, NY, NY, Martha L. Volk, wife, 42, NY, VT, VT, Cornelius G. Volk, Jr., 22, IL   Census Image
In 1900, Martha, age 71, born September 1828 in New York, a widow, has had 2 children, 1 living, and is living with that son, Cornelius G. Volk, Jr. in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois      Census Image
Children of Cornelius Volk and Martha Barlow are:
9 i.
HENRY B. VOLK3, born c1846 in New York, and died before 1900, probably in Illinois.
10 ii.
CORNELIUS G. VOLK, JR. born c1859 in Illinois, and died before 1910.
 
4.
EMILY CLARRISA BARLOW2, (Jonathan1) was born 23 August 1832 in New York, and died 28 May 1897, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois

She married LEONARD WELLS VOLK on 28 April 1852, probably in Adams Co Illinois.   The son of Garrett Volk and Elizabeth Gesner, he was born 07 November 1828 in Wells, Hamilton Co New York, and died 18 August 1895 in Osceola, Polk Co Wisconsin, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois, where a statue of him is erected.
Photo of statue 1 from Find-a-Grave.com   Photo of statue 2 from Find-a-Grave.com
Leonard Wells Volk
Century Biographical Dictionary of Notable Americans: Volume X   page 265

VOLK, Leonard Wells, sculptor, was born in Wellstown - Wells, N.Y., November 7, 1828; son of Garrett and Elizabeth 'Gesner' Volk; grandson of Cornelius and Jenny 'Conkiln' Gesner, and a descendant, through his mother, of Everardus Bogardus, who came from Holland to New Amsterdam about 1635, where he was the first Dutch minister. His father was a marble-cutter, in whose shop at Pittsfield, Massachusetts, he was employed, 1844-48, removing to St. Louis, Missouri, in the latter year, where he was engaged in marble work and sculpture, and devoted his leisure to drawing and clay-modeling. He modeled a bust of Henry Clay, the first bust made west of the Mississippi.
He was married, April 28, 1852, to Emily Clarissa, daughter of Dr. Jonathan King and Honor 'Douglas' Barlow of Bethany, N.Y., and cousin of Stephen A. Douglas, under whose patronage he studied art in Italy, 1855-57.
On his return in 1857, he established himself in Chicago, Illnois, where he modeled a bust of Stephen A. Douglas, the first bust ever made in Chicago. He continued his work in Italy, 1868-69 and 1871-72.
He was a member of the Chicago Academy of Design, which he helped to organize, 1867, and served as its president for many years. He organized the first art exhibition of Chicago, 1859; exhibited at the Paris exposition, 1867; and the World's Columbian exposition, 1893. His portrait busts include the following subjects: Stephen A. Douglas -1857; Abraham Lincoln -1860, the original marble being destroyed in the Chicago fire of 1871; Henry Clay, Zechariah Chandler. Dr. Daniel Brainerd, and Elihu B. Washburne; statue of General James Shields in the statuary gallery, capitol at Washington; life mask of Lincoln -1860; the Douglas monument -1868, Chicago, Illinois; life-size statues of Douglas and Lincoln - 1876, in the Illinois state capitol; the statuary for the Henry Keep mausoleum, Watertown, N.Y., and various soldiers' monuments.
He died in Osceola, Wisconsin, August 19, 1895.
From Wikipedia:

Leonard Wells Volk (November 7, 1828 - August 19, 1895) was an American sculptor. He is notable for making one of only two life masks of United States President Abraham Lincoln. In 1857 he helped establish the Chicago Academy of Design and served as its president until 1865. He made several large monumental sculptures, including the tomb of the politician Stephen A. Douglas, and statues of American Civil War figures.

Biography
Volk was born at Wellstown (now Wells), Hamilton County, New York to Garrett and Elizabeth (Gesner) Volk. He first followed the trade of a marble cutter with his father in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, where the family moved.

Marriage and family
Before 1855 Volk married Emily Clarissa King Barlow, daughter of Honor (Douglas) and Dr. Jonathan King Barlow of Bethany, New York. A maternal cousin of hers was Stephen A. Douglas, a nationally known politician who ran against Abraham Lincoln for the Republican Party presidential nomination in 1860.

Their son Stephen A. Douglas Volk (1856–1935) as an adult became notable as a figure and portrait painter. He studied under Jean-Léon Gérome in Paris. Later he helped establish the Minneapolis School of Design.

Career
In 1848 Volk moved west and opened an artist's studio in St Louis, Missouri. From 1855-1857, Stephen A. Douglas, his wife's cousin, supported the family's travel to Rome so that Volk could pursue additional study.

Returning to the United States in 1857, Volk and his family settled in the booming city of Chicago, where he helped to establish the Chicago Academy of Design, precursor to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. For eight years, he served as its director and taught numerous students, including Elbridge Ayer Burbank, who became noted for his more than 1200 portraits of Native Americans.
In 1860 Volk made a life mask of the state senator Abraham Lincoln. Only one other was made, by Clark Mills in 1865. In the early part of spring 1860, during Lincoln's visit to Chicago, Volk asked him to sit for a bust. The artist decided to start by doing a life mask. Lincoln found the process of letting wet plaster dry on his face, followed by a skin-stretching removal process, "anything but agreeable". But he maintained good humor, and was pleased with the final bust. He declared it "the animal himself".  Volk later used the life mask and bust of 1860 as the basis for other versions of Lincoln, including a full-size statue. The life mask was also studied by other artists, such as Daniel Chester French.
In mid-May 1860, Volk went to Springfield to present the Lincolns with the completed cabinet bust. He had just received the nomination as presidential candidate for the Republican Party. The following day Volk asked Lincoln to allow a casting of both his hands, for use in other sculptural works. Volk wanted Lincoln to hold something to simulate grasping a document in his right hand. Lincoln came back from his tool shed with a whittled piece of broom handle. The casting for Lincoln's right hand was made as he held the broom handle. Lincoln's left hand was cast slightly closed but empty.

Principal works:
Stephen A. Douglas Tomb at Chicago, Illinois
Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument at Rochester, New York
Statues of Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas in the Illinois State Capitol at Springfield, Illinois
Statue of General James Shields in Statuary Hall, United States Capitol
Statues of Elihu B. Washburne, Zachariah Chandler and David Davis

Legacy and honors
1880, Volk was elected to the Society of American Artists.
1899, elected to the National Academy of Design in 1899.

Attribution:  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed (1911). "Volk, Leonard Wells". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.
Nov 07. 1931, The Lethbridge Herald - Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
FUTURE SCULPTOR SAVED - BITS OF BROKEN MARBLE.

Leonard Volk's family had moved to a now home in Massachusetts, and Leonard was pleased with the change. They had been in the town only a few days when Leonard, out taking a walk to explore the surrounding country,made a discovery. He saw a number of men working in a quarry amd went up to investigate. 'What are you getting out of here?" he asked, his eyes wide with wonder. "Marble," said one of the workmen briefly. Leonard knew that marble was the beautiful stone 'with which fine buildings were decorated, and out of which statues were made. He waited around and watched tha workmen and finally they let him carry home a bit of broken and discolored marble. He ran home and showed it to his mother with great pride. "What are you going to do with it?" she smiled.
" I'm going to be a marble cutter," he declared. When he grew older he actually worked as a marble cutter, to earn his living. And when he was grown up he became a famous sculptor, making lovely statues out of the marble that had charmed him since he was a small boy.
Leonard Wells Volk was born in New York, November 7, 1828.

Archives of American Art, Stephen A. Douglas Volk and Leonard Wells Volk papers, 1845-1960
http://www.aaa.si.edu/collections/stephen-douglas-volk-and-leonard-wells-volk-papers-9669
I was unable to locate Leonard and Emily in an 1860 census, though their son Stephen shows his birthplace in 1856 as Pittsfield, Berkshire Co Massachusetts
A passport was issued to Leonard W. Volk on 07 November 1868, his arrival back in New York was 05 May 1869
08 August 1870, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois   pg 262b   Douglas House Hotel:   Leonard W. Volk, 41, NY, Emily C. Volk, 37, NY, Douglas Volk, 14, MA, Nora Volk, 9, IL    Census Image
09 June 1880, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois   pg 204a    #36/201/298:  Leonard W. Volk, 51, NY, PA, OH, Emily C. Volk, wife, 46, NY, VT, VT, Nora E. Volk, daughter, 18, IL, Augusta Meyer, servant, IL, MA, NY      Census Image
Children of Leonard Volk and Emily Barlow are:
i. ARTHUR DOUGLAS VOLK, born 23 April 1853, and died 31 October 1855, memorial on the monument of his parents
ii. ADELE DOUGLAS VOLK, born 17 April 1864, and died 09 August 1865, memorial on the monument of her parents
11 iii.
STEPHEN ARNOLD DOUGLAS VOLK, born 23 February 1856 in Pittsfield, Berkshire Co Massachusetts, and died 07 February 1936 in Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine, burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine.  
12 iv.
HONORA ELIZABETH VOLK, born 13 July 1861, and died 13 December 1928, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois
 
5.
JOSEPH CHOTEAU BARLOW2, (Jonathan1) was born 1836 in Bethany, Genesee Co New York, and died 1895 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.   Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman

He married EVELINE STREETER on 25 February 1858 in Adams Co Illinois.  The daughter of Joshua Wood Streeter and Deliah Smith?, she was born 01 August 1837, and died 1904, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
Corn Planter Co
QUINCY AND ADAMS COUNTY, HISTORY AND REPRESENTATIVE MEN
by David Wilcox - Lewis Publishing 1919   Vol. 2 pp. 835-836

In the invention and use of appliances and devices for saving time and labor in the agricultural industry, America has led the world for many years. Hence, in part, has come the wonderful prosperity that has made the United States the granary of the world, her inventions making it possible to far outdistance other lands where primitive methods of agriculture have been retained. One of the exceedingly valuable inventions is the corn-planter, which piece of machinery is indispensable in the great corn belt of the country, and which, with a few improvements, is constructed practically on the same lines as those manufactured in Adams County, Illinois, seventy years ago, by Joseph C. BARLOW. He was the father of Joseph BARLOW [Jr.], one of Quincy's representative business men of today, who is manager of the Quincy Foundry & Novelty Company.
Joseph Barlow [Jr.] was born in this city, April 19, 1868. His parents were Joseph C. and Eveline (Streeter) Barlow, the former of whom was born in 1836, in Genesee County, New York, and the latter in Kentucky. Of their family of ten children there are four survivors, namely; John W., who is a resident of Kansas City, Missouri; Ella M., who is the widow of James W. Fairman, of Kansas City; Joseph; and Emily L., who is the wife of J.O. Glenn, of Quincy, Illinois. In 1848 Joseph C. BARLOW came to Adams Co Illinois. He had been reared on a farm but the possession of mechanical ability led him finally into a manufacturing business and he produced some of the first corn-planters used in this section, and in the study of his product he found where a better planter could be made and set about its invention. In time he was successful in securing a patent for this invention, which became known as the Barlow Corn Planter, and Mr. BARLOW established his manufacturing plant for the same on Front and Cedar Streets, Quincy. For many years he continued in the active conduct of his business there, his corn planter meeting with a wide sale and continuing in favor long after later patented machines came upon the market, because of its practical qualities and reasonable cost.  Mr. BARLOW died in 1895. His widow survived many years afterward, passing away at Quincy in 1905.
Joseph BARLOW [Jr.] was educated in the public schools of Quincy. With an inherited taste for mechanics he then entered his father's foundry and from the age of nineteen years to thirty he was connected with the business of the Barlow Corn Planter Company. In 1898 he came to the Quincy Foundry and Novelty Company, and has continued as manager here ever since.
Mr. BARLOW was married October 25, 1893, to Miss Georgie H. BERRY, who was born in Illinois. They have had two children neither of whom survived infancy.
Mr. BARLOW belongs to the Rotary Club and politically is a republican but has never been particularly active in political life and has never sought public office.
It is a matter of some pride to him that on the paternal side he can claim relationship with so great a man as Stephen A Douglas, who was his father's first cousin.

Barlow Corn Planter

Joseph C. BARLOW was born in Bethany, Genesee Co New York, in 1836, and came to Quincy in 1848.

After engaging in business in Quincy for some years he lived in St. Louis eight years, returning to Quincy in 1865. While in St. Louis, during the war, he was cashier for the general quartermaster of the West for three years. On returning to Quincy, Mr. BARLOW engaged in the manufacture of corn-planters, and has since followed this business, until the name "BARLOW" is known among the farmers all over the country.

Mr. BARLOW lives in a fine house on North Sixth Street. His wife was Miss Eveline STREETER, a sister of Mrs. Gov. WOOD and Mrs. Samuel HOLMES, and they were married in 1858.  Mr. Barlow's mother, before marriage, bore the name of Honor DOUGLAS, and was an aunt of the great Stephen A. DOUGLAS.
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Norma Zimmerman, formerly of Quincy, Illinois is not related to the Barlow's but has graciously taken many of the photos of tombstones for this family from the Woodland Cemetery. Her interest in the Barlow's is with a house they had owned of which she writes:  There was one house in Quincy that I use to love, it is no longer standing, as  the city took it down about 10 or so years ago.  The history of the house is as follows, and I don't have my records so I am doing this from memory.  It was built by a by a man named Green, for a man named George Washington Graves, he in turn sold it to a man named Joseph Barlow who was married to Eveline Streeter Barlow, the sister of John Woods' second wife and they were married in the John Wood home. They lived at 317 Kentucky then on Sixth St.  Then they moved to 809 N 6th St to the home built by Mr. Green.  He spent $25,000.00 remodeling the home. One of his daughters was married in the home I am thinking it was Ella. In 1983 or 95 in December there was a fire in the basement of the home.  The house substained a lot of damage more from the fire department trying to put it out. I found the city directory showing the house was turned into a duplex around that time address was 809 and 811 North Sixth.  He died shortly after that.  His wife Eveline died in either 04 or 05 she was living at 809 N. 6th.  The house was left to Ella in the will she was living in Kansas City. She in turn sold the house to her sister who was married to a man named Glenn.  I am thinking, at some point after that she sold the house and moved.  One of her brothers was living for a while on North Sixth, the house on the northeast corner of 6th and Lind.  That house is still standing, I am thinking that this brother moved to South 16th Street and later to the 200th block.  I am doing this all from memory so I may have names missing
02 July 1860, St Louis, Ward 5, St Louis, Missouri   pg 159  #913/1068:  Joseph C. Barlow, 34, NY, Evlien Barlow, 22, IL, John W. Barlow, 1, MO, Ellen Maggin, 20, servant, IRE          Census Image
12 July 1870, Quincy, Ward 3, Adams Co Illinois   pg 475b   #115/146:  Joseph C. Barlow, 34, NY, Eveline Barlow, 33, IL, John W. Barlow, 11, MO, Helen Barlow, 8, IL, Emily Barlow, 4, IL, Joseph Barlow, 2, IL, Eveline Barlow, 1, IL, Fanny McMullen, housekeeper, 44, ENG, Fanny McMullen, servant, 14, TN    Census Image
02 June 1880, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois   pg 439c   #439c:  Joseph C. Barlow, 42, NY, NY, VT, Eveline S. Barlow, wife, 41, IL, NY, KY, John W. Barlow, son, 21, MO, Ella M. Barlow, daughter, 18, IL, Emily L. Barlow, daughter, 14, IL, Joseph C. Barlow, son, 12, IL, Eva E., daughter, 10, IL, Willie R. Barlow, son, 7, Alice Barlow, daughter, 4, IL, Nameless Barlow, son, 3 mo, born March, IL, Fannie McMullen, nurse, 55, ENG, Annie Zoler, servant, 21, GER, Fannnie McMullen, servant, 22, TN   Census Image
07 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 1, Adams Co Illinois  pg 8a   #809/143/160:  Evelyne S. Barlow, widow, 9 children born, 4 living, 62, born August 1837, IL, MA, KY, Emily Glenn, daughter, 34, born February 1866, IL, OH, IL, Oliver J. Glenn, son-in-law, age 38, born December 1860, OH, OH, OH, Arthur B. Glenn, grandson, 13, born April 1887, IL, Jeanette Shelton, servant, 23, born October 1876, MO   Census Image
Children of Joseph Barlow and Eveline Streeter are:
13 i. JOHN WOOD BARLOW3, born February 1859 in St. Louis, St. Louis Co Missouri, and died 1921, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.
14 ii. ELLA M. BARLOW, born 03 September 1861 in Adams Co Illinois, and died 01 June 1939 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri. 
iii.

JOSEPH CHOTEAU BARLOW, JR.,  born 19 April 1868 in Illinois, and died 11 September 1924 in Prairie, Hancock Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.      Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
He married  GEORGIA E. BERRY on 25 October 1893 in Adams Co Illinois.   The daughter of William W. Berry and Georgie Hewitt, she was born 18 October 1868 in Nashville, Davidson Co Tennesee, and died in 07 November 1944 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois., burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.     Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman.    They had two children, both died in infancy.
05 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 7, Adams Co Illinois pg 4b #323/73/77: Married 6 years, 0 children: Joseph C. Barlow, 32, born April 1868, IL, IL, IL, Georgia E. Barlow, wife, born October 1868, TN, KY, KY          Census Image
25 April 1910, Quincy, Ward 7, Adams Co Illinois pg 7b #319/156/158: Married 16 years, 2 children born, 0 living: Joseph C. Barlow, 42, IL, IL, IL, Georgia B. Barlow, wife, 41, TN, MD, KY      Census Image
10-12 January 1920, Quincy, Ward 7, Adams Co Illinois pg 11a #319/289/201: Joseph C. Barlow, 51, IL, IL, IL, Georgia B. Barlow, wife, 51, TN, MD, KY      Census Image
03 April 1930, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois pg 2a #1866/39/42: Georgie B. Barlow, widowed, 61, TN, MD, KY, Anna Huseman, servant, 58, IL      Census Image

15 iv. EMILY L. BARLOW, born February 1866 in Illinois, and died after 1930, probably in Adams Co Illinois
v.
EVA ELIZABETH BARLOW, born c1870 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, death date unknown, died at age 12 years, 5 months, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.    Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
vi.
WILLIAM R. BARLOW, born c1873 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, and died at age 18, in 1891, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois. Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
vii. ALICE/ALLIE BARLOW, born c1876 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, death date unknown, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
viii.
DOUGLAS STREETER BARLOW, dates unknown, died at 3 months of age, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
ix.
EVIE DOUGLAS, dates unknown, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman  Tombstone shared with Josie, see next.
x. JOSIE KING BARLOW, dates unknown, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
GENERATION 3
6.
STEPHEN DOUGLAS BARLOW, JR.3 (STEPHEN2, JONATHAN1), was born June 1845 in St. Louis Missouri, and died 20 February 1917 in Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois, burial in Oak Ridge Cemetery, Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois.

He married MISSOURI 'ZOULA' M. WILLIAMS.  The daughter of Septimas Ligon Williams and Sarah F. White, she was born 16 October 1853 in Bedford Co Virginia, and died August 29, 1935 in Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois, burial in Bellfontaine Cemetery, St Louis, Missouri. 
07 June 1900, St. Louis, Ward 28, St. Louis, Missouri   pg 7a  #4227/99/108:    Stephen D. Barlow, 54, born June 1845, MO, NY, NY, Missouri Barlow, wife, 46, born October 1853, VA, VA, VA, borned 1 child, 1 living, Margaret D. Barlow, daughter, 14, born January 1886, MO      Census Image
15 April 1910, St. Louis, Ward 28, St. Louis, Missouri   pg 2b   #951/39/39:  Married 26 years, 1 child born, 1 living:   Stephen D. Barlow, age 64, MO, VT, NY, Missouri M. Barlow, wife, 55, VA, VA, VA, Margaret D. Barlow, daughter, 24, MO    Census Image
02 January 1920, St. Louis, Ward 25, St. Louis, Missouri   pg 1b  Hotel:   Zoula W. Barlow, widowed, 64, VA, VA, VA        Census Image
In 1930, Soula is age 76, living with daughter Margaret Cowden in Sangamon Co Illinois.      Census Image
Child of Stephen Barlow and Missouri Williams is:
16 i. MARGARET DICKSON BARLOW4, born 03 January 1886 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died 09 July 1980 in San Mateo Co California
 
7.
MARGARET 'MAGGIE' DICKSON BARLOW3, (STEPHEN2, JONATHAN1), was born October 1849 in New York.

She married CHARLES HUNT TURNER in 1870.   The son of Henry Smith Turner and Julia Hunt, he was born 14 December 1849 in St. Louis Missouri, and died 22 February 1906 in New York, burial in Calvary Cemetery, St Louis, St Louis Missouri.   Death Certificate
The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, Volume 12

TURNER, Charles Hunt, merchant and capitalist, was born in St. Louis, Mo., in December, 1849, son of Henry S. and Julia M. (Hunt) Turner. His father, a native of Virginia, was a graduate of West Point, was assistant U. S. treasurer in St. Louis, and president of the Union National and the Lucas Bank. The son was educated in the St. Louis schools and Seton Hall College, New Jersey. He began his business career at the age of twenty in the real estate business, under the name of Charles H. Turner & Co., and met with immediate and continuous success. When his company was merged in the Commonwealth Trust Co. in 1901, he was its president until he resigned in February, 1903. He was appointed financial agent of the Prudential Insurance Co.. a position he held for eight years, and on the reorganization of the St. Louis and Suburban railway he became its president and held the office twelve years, during which the policy of the company expanded and the service to the traveling public was greatly improved. He devoted very close attention to the development of its property, and at the time of his resignation the road was paying a substantial dividend, and had a standing as one of the best equipped and best managed in the West. He is also a member of the board of directors of many of the leading institutions of St. Louis, among which are the Mississippi Valley Trust Co. and Mechanics' National Bank, and he was a director of the St. Louis exposition, in which he served as a member of the committee on transportation and as vice-chairman of the committee on police. He is a member of the St. Louis, the University, and Noonday clubs.

He was married in 1870, to Margaret E., daughter of Stephen D. Barlow, of St. Louis, Mo., and has two sons, Hunt and Douglass Turner, and one daughter, the wife of Duncan Joy.
Charles Hunt Turner
In a blog dated 2007, concerning 19th century baseball in St Louis, Jeffrey Kittel writes of Charles H. Turner:

Charles Turner was born in 1849 to Henry S. Turner and Julia Hunt. Henry Turner was a West Point graduate and classmate and friend of William T. Sherman who served with Stephan Kearney in the Mexican-American War. Julia Hunt was the daughter of Theodore Hunt, a naval officer and favorite in St. Louis social circles, and Anne Lucas, the only daughter of J.B.C. Lucas, one of the earliest settlers of St. Louis and one of its wealthiest and most influential citizens. H.S. Turner, with the support of his wife’s powerful family, would serve as a member of the St. Louis Board of Aldermen, the Missouri State Legislature, and as Assistant United States Treasurer. In the 1880 census, he listed his occupation as “retired capitalist.” In the 1870’s, H.S. Turner, as a member of the Board of Aldermen, would introduce legislation that established the street car system in St. Louis. Within a few years, his son Charles would own the company that his father helped to establish.
Charles Turner, according to Jeremiah Fruin, was an original member of the Union Base Ball Club of St. Louis. Other members of Turner’s social set who were members of the club included his cousin Robert Lucas, Shepard Barkley, Joseph Charles Cabanne, Orrick Bishop, and Harry Carr. Turner, a catcher, was described as a part of the original battery of the Union nine. He also pitched and played second base for the club. His membership in the original Union Club raises some questions. If the club was founded in the early 1860’s at about the same time as the Empire Club (and they were certainly playing baseball by 1861) then Turner could not have been an original member, being too young. It’s most likely that Turner did not join the club until after the Civil War.
In 1875, Turner was involved in the founding of the Brown Stockings. With the urging of newspaper men W.C. Steigers and R.P. Thompson, “several young St. Louisans of prominence” set up an organization to create a professional baseball team in St. Louis that could compete with the professional Chicago White Stockings. The board of directors that was elected to run the new organization included J.B.C Lucas, president; W.C. Steigers, vice-president; Charles A. Fowle, secretary; and Charles Turner, treasurer. Other members of the board included Orrick Bishop, William Medart, and Joseph Carr. Interestingly, the Union Club was heavily represented on the board with Turner, Steigers, and Bishop all being members and with the possibility that Lucas and Carr were as well. The Lucas family was also well represented with Turner joining his cousin J.B.C. Lucas on the board.
While it’s unknown exactly what role Turner played with the Brown Stockings, he was involved, according to Jon David Cash, in the signing of the Louisville players in 1877. These signings which were an attempt to duplicate Chicago’s raid on the Boston Red Stockings, coupled with the gambling scandal that involved both the signed Louisville players as well as members of the Brown Stocking nine, helped to bring about the collapse of the Brown Stockings organization and the experiment with professional baseball in St. Louis.
It’s difficult to overstate the prominence of Charles Turner in 19th century St. Louis. Not only was he a member of the wealthiest St. Louis family, he also married into another prominent family. His wife Margaret was the daughter of Stephen Barlow, the cousin of Stephen Douglas and a wealthy politician and railroad magnate in St. Louis. Turner himself was the president of the Suburban Railway Company, which owned the St. Louis street car system, and the Commonwealth Trust Company. He was described by Lincoln Steffens as being a millionaire and served on the St. Louis Board of Police Commissioners in the 1880’s. Turner also was a member of the Board of Directors of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Company, which raised the money to put on the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis.
Turner’s influence in St. Louis was exposed in a negative way by Steffen in 1902. In what became known as “The Boodle Scandal,” Turner was shown to have been a member of a cabal that bribed city aldermen and state legislators in order to get legislation passed that was favorable to their business interests. In grand jury testimony, Turner was shown to have paid over $144,000 in bribes to secure legislation that would double the value of the Suburban Railway Company, which he was looking to sell. The case was tied up in court for several years and Turner died in 1906 before facing the legal consequences of his actions.
While “The Boodle Scandal” and Steffen’s exposes may have tarnished Turner’s reputation, his legacy was saved by the service of his grandson. Charles Turner Joy was the son of Charles Turner’s only daughter, Lucy Barlow Turner, and Duncan Joy. He graduated from Annapolis in 1916 and served in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. During Korea, Rear Admiral Charles Turner Joy served as Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. After he passed away in 1956, a destroyer was named after him. The USS Turner Joy served the nation proudly until it was decommissioned in 1982.
Charles H. Turner was mentioned several times in the following article concerning the De Hodiamont Car House Historic District:  http://www.dnr.mo.gov/shpo/nps-nr/05000012.pdf   which seems to verify the information of Jeffrey Kittel.
Obituary in St Louis Dispatch, February 23, 1906  [If anyone has access to this record, I would love to have a copy for this genealogy]
03 June 1880, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri   pg 194c   #2119/56/68:   Charles H. Turner, 30, MO, CA, MO, Margaret Turner, wife, 30, NY, VT, NY, Lucy B. Turner, daughter, 9. MO, Charles H. Turner, Jr., son, 6, MO, Lena Ehlich, servant, 20, MO, Hulda Peterson, servant, 29, SWE, Louisa Kramer, servant, 35, GER     Census Image
03 July 1900, St Louis, Ward 25, St Louis, Missouri   pg 3a  #4241/321/337:  Married 29 years, 3 children born, 3 living:  Charles H. Turner, 50, born December 1849, MO, VA, MO, M.D. Turner, wife, 50, born October 1849, NY, VT, NY, S.D.B. Turner, son, 16, born September 1883, MO, Kate Roach, servant, born September 1886, IRE, Mary Bradish, servant, 46, born February 1854, MO     Census Image
Children of Charles Turner and Margaret Barlow are:
17 i.
LUCY BARLOW TURNER4, born 09 September 1871 in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri, and died March 1948, burial in Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri.
18 ii.
CHARLES 'HUNT' TURNER, JR., born 03 January 1874 or 1875 in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.
iii.
STEPHEN 'DOUGLAS' BARLOW TURNER, born 08 September 1883 in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri.  Birth Record   I found a passenger list for the ship 'Amerika' departing Cherbourg France, and arriving New York, New York, dated 23 September 1906, which included 23 year old Douglas and his mother, Mrs. Charles H. Turner.  I could not locate him or his mother in a 1910 census.  The census of St Louis, Ward 23, St Louis, Missouri, dated 15-16 January 1920 shows Douglas as age 36, born in Missouri, and his wife, Margaret, age 33, born in Germany, naturalized in 1887, no children.  I was unable to locate Douglas again in the 1930 census.
 
8.
AGNES BARLOW3, (STEPHEN2, JONATHAN1), was born June 1860 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, and died 12 May 1907 in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri.

She married DANIEL MALOTT HOUSER on 23 January 1889 in St. Louis, St Louis Co Missouri.  The son of Elias Houser and Eliza Malott, he was born 23 December 1834 in Washington Co Maryland, and died in 10 October 1915, both buried in Bellfontaine Cemetery, St. Louis Missouri.  Tombstone Photo 1    Tombstone Photo 2     Tombstone Photo 3     Daniel had previously been married to Margaret /Marguerite J. Ingram/Ingraham and had 4 children with her
Daniel Mallott Houser
Agnes Houser
Who's Who in Finance, Banking and Insurance: A Biographical ..., Volume 1, edited by John William Leonard
DANIEL M. HOUSER
Newspaper proprietor, capitalist; born In Washington County, Md., Dec. 23, 1834; son of Elias and Eliza H. Houser; educated in high schools; married, first, Nov. 25. 1862. Margeurite J. Ingram (died Feb. 18. 1880): second at St. Louis, Jan. 23, 1889, to Agnes Barlow (died May 12, 1907); children: Malotte. Stephen Douglas, Barlow, Duncan P. Entered newspaper career in 1851 in the employ of the St. Louis Union; was bookkeeper and general manager, 1854-1862, and became proprietor of same paper 1862; was business and financial manager of the Missouri Democrat, 1862-1872; founded in 1872 the St. Louis Globe, which was consolidated In 1875 with the Democrat under the name of the Globe-Democrat, and has since been Its president and general manager. Delegate-at-large and chairman of Missouri delegation In Republican National Convention of 1900; Republican presidential elector-at-large, 1904. Republican. Address: Southwest corner 6th and Pine Sts., St. Louis.
New York Times, October 10, 1915

DANIEL M. HOUSER DEAD.
Publisher of The St. Louis Globe-Democrate Was in His 82d Year.
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Oct. 9.-- Daniel M. Houser, President of the Globe Publishing Company, and publisher of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, died here early this morning.
He was born in Washington County, Md., and was in his eighty-second year. Mr. Houser was educated at the grade and high schools, and in 1861 began newspaper work in St. Louis as a book-keeper. In 1854 he was General Manager, and in 1862 became proprietor, business and financial manager of the Missouri Democrat.
In 1872 he left The Democrat and founded The St. Louis Globe, which was consolidated with The Democrat, under the name of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, three years later. Since that time Mr. Houser had been President and General Manager of the corporation.
Mr. Houser was Delegate at Large and Chairman of the Missouri delegation to the Republican National Convention in 1900 and a Presidential Elector four years later. He was married twice, his second wife, Miss Agnes Barlow of St. Louis dying in 1907.
14 June 1900, St Louis, Ward 28, St Louis Missouri   pg 12b   #4545/197/214:  Married 11 years, 4 children born, 3 living:  Daniel M. Houser, 65, born December 1835, MO, __, __, Agnes B. Houser, wife, 39, born June 1860, MO, MO, MO, Agnes M. Houser, daughter, 10, born January 1890, MO, Douglass B. Houser, son, 7, born August 1892, MO, Duncan P. Houser, son, 6, born April 1894, MO, Patrick J. Hanley, servant, __, __, __, Minnie Schermer, servant, 28, born June 1871, MO, Catherine Connell, servant, 22, born March 1878, IRE, August Hadenkamp, servant, 20, born December 1879, MO, Nellie Neville, servant, 21, born April 1879, IRE     Census Image
16 April 1910, St Louis, Ward 25, St Louis, Missouri   pg 1b  #4545/17/17:   Daniel M. Houser, widower, 75, MD, MD, MD, Mylott Houser, daughter, 19, MO, Douglas Houser, son, 18, MO, Duncan P. Houser, son, 16, MO, Lily H. Aderton, daughter, 42, MO, William Aderton, son-in-law, 44, MO, [married 15 years, 1 child born, 0 living], John McMillan, servant, 36, SCOT, Nellie Neville, servant, 31, IRE, Margaret Neville, servant, 24, IRE, Bridgett Conners, servant, 32, IRE, Minnie Schermer, servant, 21, GER      Census Image
Children of Daniel Houser and Agnes Barlow are:
19 i. AGNES MALOTT HOUSER4, born January 1890 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died October 1967 in Missouri.
20 ii. DOUGLAS BARLOW HOUSER, born 28 August 1892 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, and died August 1966 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri
21 iii.
DUNCAN PREWITT HOUSER, born 28 April 1894 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri.
 
9.
HENRY B. VOLK3, (Martha2, Jonathan1), was born c1846 in New York, and died before 1900, probably in Illinois. In the 1900 census of Adams Co Illinois, his mother is living with son, Cornelius, and she is shown to have had 2 children, only 1 still living.

He married JENNIE GAVIET on 30 November 1871 in Adams Co Illinois.
Henry Volk of Quincy Illinois was an alumni of Shurtleff College, Upper Alton Illinois, class of 1867-1868.
04 June 1880, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois   pg 358c  #472/123/127:   Henry B. Volk, 34, NY, CT, NY, Jennie Volk, wife, 26, IL, IL, IL, Jessie Volk, daughter, 1, IL, Elizabeth H. Goodwin, aunt, 56, NY, VT, VT, Emma Grant, servant, 18, IL      Census Image 1   Census Image 2
Child of Henry Volk and Jennie Gaviet is:
i. JESSIE VOLK4, born c1879 in Illinois
 
10. CORNELIUS G. VOLK, JR.3 (Martha2, Jonathan1), was born March 1858 in Illinois, and died before 1910.

He married EMMA F. CORLEY on 21 September 1882 in Adams Co Illinois.  The daughter of William H. Corley and Ann Marie Fisk, she was born 12 April 1861 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died 13 March 1947 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois. 
14-18 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 5, Adams Co Illinois     pg 16a  #1259/327/362:  Married 18 years, 2 children born, 1 living:  C.G. Volk,, 42, born March 1858, IL, NY, NY, Emma Volk, wife, 39, born April 1861, MO, NY, NJ, Wm. C. Volk, son, 16, born August 1883, IL, Martha Volk, mother, widowed, 2 children born, 1 living, born September 1828, NY, VT, VT, Emma Spellmiers, servant, 25, born January 1875, IL     Census Image
In 1910 and 1920, Emma is living with son, William C. Volk
02 April 1930, Central, St Louis Missouri   pg 1a  #3722/9/9:  Emma Volk, widowed, 68, MO, PA, NY, is a boarder in the Roever / Hancock home.   Census Image
Child of Cornelius Volk and Emma Corley is:
22 i.
WILLIAM CORNELIUS VOLK4, born 14 August 1883 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.
 
11.
STEPHEN ARNOLD 'DOUGLAS' VOLK3, (Emily2, Jonathan1), was born 23 February 1856 in Pittsfield, Berkshire Co Massachusetts, and died 07 February 1935 in Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine, burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine.

He married 1) MARION BREWER LARRABEE on 25 June 1881 in Chicago, Cook Co Illinois.  The daughter of William M. Larrabee and Mary Margaret Haight or William D. Larrabee and Mary A. Bemus, she was born 06 March 1858, and died 11 January 1925, burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine.
He married 2) JESS after Marion's death.
Douglas Volk, 1925
Douglas Volk, 1925
Douglas Volk
Douglas Volk
Marion Larrabee Volk
Marion Larrabee Volk
Douglas and Marion Volk
Marion & Douglas Volk
Hewnoaks Main House
Main house at Hewnoak
The National Cyclopaedia of American Biography: being the history ... Volume 7

VOLK, Stephen Arnold Douglas, artist, was born at Pittsfleld, Mass., February 23, 1851, son of Leonard Wells and Emily Clarissa (Barlow) Volk. When quite young he removed with his parents to Chicago, Ill., where he grew up in a home atmosphere conducive to artistic development, although doing no work in either drawing or painting until he was fourteen years old, when he went to Rome on a visit with his father and mother. Here he became acquainted with several artists, and growing interested in their work, began to paint for himself, although without any other instruction than what he chanced to pick up. He attended the St. Luke's Academy, the French school in Rome, and occasionally "gigis" night class, but without aid from any teacher. When the family left Rome young Volk desired to remain and continue his art work, and after some deliberation he was allowed to do so. Two Russians, Oroloski aud Bogoluboff, were an especial inspiration to him about this time. His work while in Rome was chiefly landscapes, scenes from the Campagna and the environs of the city. In 1873 he studied in Paris, where by means of a permit from Gerome he was admitted to his class in the Ecole des Beaux Arts, working there for two years. In 1875 he exhibited his first work in the salon, being one of the youngest of that year's exhibitors. The subject of this piece is a landscape and peasant girl, called " En Bretague." Soon after, Mr. Volk returned-to America, and exhibited at the Centennial in 1876. Revisiting Paris, he worked under Gerome and exhibited in the Salon of 1878 a portrait of "Miss T." He also made a sketching tour through England, spending much time in Warwickshire. Upon his return to America, in 1879, he was offered a professorship in Cooper Institute, New York City, was elected a member of the Society of American Artists, and exhibited a number of paintings, among others, "The Puritan Maiden," "Accused of Witchcraft." and a portrait of "Miss H." In 1889, at the Paris exposition, he showed "The Captives," purchased by George I. Seney of New York, and "The Bride," owned by E. J. Phelps of Minneapolis. During his residence in the latter city, Mr. Volk devoted himself to the school of fine arts, which he founded in 1886 under the auspices of the Fine Art Society, but in October, 185)3, he became instructor in the Art Students' League and Cooper Institute, New York city. He was made a member of t he national jury of selection for painting at the Columbian exposition, held in Chicago, 1893, and also exhibited there three pictures, "Mending the Canoe," "The Puritan Maiden," and "Portrait of Mrs. Lowry." He was awarded a medal for his exhibit. Other important pictures are "Autumn" (1893); "Flower of the Colony" (1894); "Motherhood" (1895); and the "Puritan Mother" (1897). Mr. Volk has taken much interest in the matter of art education in the public schools, having written and lectured considerably on the subject, with a view to the introduction of more artistic methodsand a higher standard of teaching, as opposed to the usual mechanical systems in art instruction. He has published "Art Instruction in the Public Schools" (1894).
He was married, June 25, 1881, to Marion B.. daughter of William M. and Margaret (Haight) Larrabee of Chicago. They have had four children: Leonard Douglas, Wendell, Gerome and Marion Volk, the first deceased.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Douglas Volk, named Stephen Arnold Douglas Volk (23 February 1856-1935) was an American portrait and landscape painter. He helped establish the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts. After 1904 he and his wife Marion created an artists' retreat at their family home, Hewnoaks, in Maine. She became active in the production of woolen textiles and rugs by traditional processes, and formed a group called Sabatos.

Early life and education
Douglas was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to Emily Clarissa King (Barlow) Volk and the sculptor Leonard Wells Volk. He was named after his mother's maternal cousin Stephen A. Douglas.
After studying in the United States, Douglas Volk went to Paris, where he was a pupil of Jean-Léon Gérôme. He exhibited in the Paris Salon of 1875. He also studied in Rome.

Marriage and family
In 1881 Volk married the artist Marion Larrabee, the first instructor at the Minneapolis School of Fine Arts, now the Minneapolis College of Art and Design. It originally served mostly women students.
Their children were the following:
Wendell (1888–1953), printmaker and woodcarver, who married Jessie J. McCoig, also an artist (b. ?-2004)
Marion, who married Mr. Bridges.
Lawrence

Career
Volk was a working artist and teacher. He taught at Cooper Union (1879-94; 1908-12), the New York Art Students League, and the National Academy of Design in New York City. He also taught at the Society for Ethical Culture established by Felix Adler.

Source
Description above from the Wikipedia article Douglas Volk, licensed under CC-BY-SA full list of contributors here. Community Pages are not affiliated with, or endorsed by, anyone associated with the topic.
This is a wonderful story about auction of the estate of Douglas and Marion Volk, known as Hewnoak: http://maineantiquedigest.com/articles_archive/articles/oct06/cyr-hewnoaks1006.htm
Lovell Maine Historical Society has several papers and several more photographs of the Volk family, many for viewing online, do a search for Volk: http://www.lovellhistoricalsociety.org/about.html
Lawsuit  of Stephen Douglas Volk vs Stowell mentions his sister Elizabeth Honora and her husband, William B. Colt
http://books.google.com/books?id=2w08AAAAIAAJ&pg=PA119&lpg=PA119&dq=leonard+volk+colt&source=bl&ots=hsDJqnmGc6&sig=
February 08, 1935 Gettysburg Times, Gettysburg PA

DOUGLAS VOLK, PAINTER OF LINCOLN, DIES AT 79    Fryeburg, Maine, Feb. 8 (AP)--

Stephen A. Douglas Volk, 79, noted American portrait painter died at his home her early Thursday.
Famed for three portraits of Abraham Lincoln. Volk was working on a fourth until his health grew feeble recently. Volk also was n oted for portraits of King Albert of Belgium, David Lloyd George, war-time premier of Great Britian, and Gen. John J. Pershing.
A widower, the artist leaves a daughter, Mrs. Ezra Bridges, of Rochester, New York, and two sons, Capt. Wendall Volk, U.S.A. stationed at Fort Williams, Cape Elizabeth, Maine, and Jerome Volk, of Lovell Maine.
Funeral services will be held Saturday.
13 June 1900, Lovell, Oxford Co Maine   pg 5b   #132/134: Married 18 years, 3 children born, 3 living:  Douglas Volk, 44, born February 1856, MA, MA, NY, Marion L. Volk, wife, 41, born March 1859, IL, NY, NY, Wendell D. Volk, son, 16, born April 1884, NY, Marion D. Volk, daughter, 12, born January 1888, MN, Gerome D. Volk, son, 9, born July 1890, MN           Census Image
22 April 1910, Manhattan, Ward 19, New York, New York   pg 4a  #510/41/67:  Married 29 years, 5 children born, 3 living:  Douglas Volk, 54, MA, MA, NY, Marion L. Volk, wife, 51, IL, NY, NY, Marion B. Volk, daughter, 21, MN       Census Image
13-14 January 1920, Manhattan, Dst 10, New York, New York    pg 10a  #299:  S.A. Douglas Volk, 63, MA, NY, NY, Marion Volk, 60, Chicago, NY, NY, Jerome Douglas Volk, son, 29, MN     Census Image
I did not find them in a 1930 census.
Children of Douglas Volk and Marion Larabee are:
i.
LEONARD 'LEO' DOUGLAS VOLK4, born 19 July 1882 in New York, and died 30 April 1891, burial in Pine Grove Cemetery, Fryeburg, Oxford Co Maine

Perhaps the best known work of Leonard (Leo) Volk's father, artist Stephen A. Douglas "Doug" Volk, is The Boy with Arrow, a portrait of his son Leo Volk, 1903, oil on canvas 46 1/8 x 36 1/8 inches, now in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery 2nd Floor. Official description: "Douglas Volk’s son, Leo, sits in a lush field at twilight, catching his breath from a day's excitement outdoors. He holds the arrow in a relaxed grip, as a confident young hunter would carry his spear. Leo occupies a transitional time in life, no longer a boy and not yet a man.
Leo Volk
ii.
WENDELL DOUGLAS VOLK, born 16 April 1884 in New York, and died 27 February 1953 in El Paso, El Paso Co Texas, burial in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington Co Virginia, Section 3 Site 4304-B
He married JESSIE JANE McCOIG c1931. The daughter of Dougal McCoig and Christina Taylor, she was born 12 September 1904 in Kent, Ontario Canada, and died 14 March 2005 in Center Lovell, Oxford Co Maine, burial in Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington Co Virginia, Section 3 Site 4304-B
Both Wendell and Jessie were artist, no children born to this couple.    Photos from Lovell Historical Society:
Wendell Volk in Uniform
Wendell in Uniform
Wendell Volk, WWI
Wendell in WWI
Wendell Volk, 1931
Wendell in 1931
Wendell Volk, 1931
Wendell in 1931
Wendell Volk Passport Photo
Wendell PP Photo
Wendell and Jessie Volk
Wendell and Jessie
Jessie Volk
Jessie
Jessie Volk
Jessie
23 ii. MARION DOUGLAS VOLK, born 01 January 1888 in Minneapolis, Anoka Co Minnesota, and died 22 September 1973 in Windsor Co Vermont.
iii.
GEROME DOUGLAS VOLK, born 18 July 1890 in Minneapolis, Anoka Co Minnesota. He was living with his parents in 1920, marital status was 'single'.  I found him on several passenger list, but never had a spouse included.  I could not find him in a 1930 census.
The History of the 107th Infantry, U.S.A. [NY]: CORPORAL JEROME D. VOLK.  For courage and determination in battle.  During the attack upon the Hindenburg Line, Sept. 29, 1918, this soldier, with seven of his comrades, having advanced to a position about fifty yards from the main German trench, in front of the canal, withstood the counter-attack of the enemy, who were in great numbers refusing to surrender until all ammunition was expended, when he was surrounded and captured after having been severly wounded.
Gerome Volk
iv. STILLBORN INFANT VOLK, born and died 10 August 1898
 
12.
HONORA 'NORA' ELIZABETH VOLK3, (Emily2, Jonathan1), was born 13 July 1861, and died 13 December 1928, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois in the Leonard Volk plot.    Tombstone Photo  

She married WILLIAM B. COLT c1907.  The son of Leonard W. Colt and Mary Blodgett, he was born June 1854 in New York, and died 21 October 1922 in Chicago, Cook Co Illinois, burial in Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo   William and Nora divorced and he married in about 1907, Ella E. Sweet.  Cook Co Death records show his status as divorced.     Tombstones from Find-a-Grave, copyrighted by Michelle Peace, 2002
Nora Volk, 1908
13 June 1900, Lovell, Oxford Co Maine   pg 5b  #134/136:  Honora E. Colt, 38, married 17 years, 3 children born, 2 living, born July 1861, IL, MA, NY, Emily C. Colt, daughter, 15, born September 1884, IL, Leonard W. Colt, son, 12, born July 1887, IL .   Census Image
04 June 1900, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois pg 3b #750/38/64: William B. Colt, age 45, born June 1854 in NY, NY, VT, married 17 years, and is a boarder in the home of Emily Macauley     Census Image
Undated, 1910, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois   pg 10a   #1124/4:  William B. Colt, age 55, 2nd marriage, 3 years in present marriage, NY, MA, VT, again living in a boarding house, no wife shown     Census Image
I was unable to locate Nora in a 1910 or 1920 census. However, her son, Leonard V. Colt shows on his WWI Draft Registration that he was living in Boston, Suffolk Co Massachusetts with his mother.   I was unable to locate Leonard in a 1910 or 20 census either, but I did locate him in NY in 1930. 
Children of Nora Volk and William Colt are:
i.
EMILY COLT4, born September 1884 in Illinois.
She married ROGER WALTER SMITH after 1910.  He was at home with his parents in the 1910 census of Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  The son of Walter P. Smith and his wife, Mary, he was born 07 September 1884 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.    WWI Draft Registration    Note that on this registration, he gives his address as 336 Hyde Park Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, the same as Leonard Volk Colt's, and he had written that he lived with his mother.  WWII Draft Registration   They lived in Boston, Suffolk Co Massachusetts in 1920 and Quincy, Norfork Co Massachusetts in 1930.  No children in either census.
ii.
LEONARD VOLK COLT, born 26 July 1887 in Chicago, Cook Co Illinois.
04 April 1930, Richmond, Ontario Co New York pg 1b #17/17: Leonard V. Colt, 42, widowed, IL, WI, IL, Leonard V. Colt, son, 7, NY, IL, NY, and Mary E. Cronin, mother-in-law, 72, NY, NJ, NY. I assume that MABLE COLT, buried in the Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois, in the Leonard Wells Volk Plot, along with Leonard Jr., is his wife, her dates 1886-1930.    Tombstone Photo    Leonard Volk Colt, Jr, was born in 1922, and died 2002, burial in the Leonard Volk family plot, Rosehill Cemetery and Mausoleum, Chicago, Cook Co Illinois.    Tombstone Photo    Tombstones from Find-a-Grave, copyrighted by Michelle Peace, 2002
 
13.
JOHN WOOD BARLOW3, (Joseph2, Jonathan), was born February 1859 in St. Louis, St. Louis Co Missouri, and died 1921, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.   Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman

He married LYDIA MAY GRAVELLE  on 26 June 1884 in Adams Co Illinois.   She was born March 1861 in Illinois.   [Apparently John W. and his sister, Ella married on the same day in Adams Co Illinois]
11 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 1, Adams Co Illinois   pg 13b   #900/289/300:  Married 16 years, 5 children born, 3 living:  John Barlow, 41, born February 1859, MO, NY, IL, Lydia M. Barlow, wife, 39, born March 1861, IL, CAN/FR, MO, John W. Barlow, Jr., son, 15, born May 1885, IL, Joseph G. Barlow, son, 13, born March 1887, IL, Evlyn A. Barlow, daughter, 10, born September 1889, IL, Agnes Murphy, servant, 23, born May 1877, IL       Census Image
18 April 1910, Kansas City, Ward 11, Jackson Co Missouri   pg 16a   #3108/76/81: Married 25 years, 6 children born, 3 living:  John W. Barlow, 46, MO, NY, IL, May L. Barlow, wife, 49, IL, FR, IRE/ENG, Joseph C. Barlow, son 21, IL, Evelyn A. Barlow, daughter, 18, IL       Census Image
I was unable to locate any of this family in the 1920 or 1930 census, except perhaps John W. Barlow, age 34, born in Illinois, was in the state hospital in St. Joseph, Buchanan Co Missouri in the 1920 census.  Since he did die in 1923, it is possible this is him.   Census Image
Children of John Barlow and Laura Gravelle are:
i.
JOHN WOOD BARLOW, JR.4, born May 1885 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, and died 1923, burial in Woodland Cemetery, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.  Tombstone Photo by Norma Zimmerman
ii.
JOSEPH CHOTEAU BARLOW, born 26 February 1887 in Illinois.   WWI Draft Registration     I think this may be him:  Joseph Choteau Barlow, died 11 June 1928, Dallas, Dallas Co Texas, DC #25049
iii. EVELYN A. BARLOW, born September 1889 in Illinois.
 
14.
ELLA M. BARLOW3, (Joseph2, Jonathan1), was born 03 September 1861 in Adams Co Illinois, and died 01 June 1939 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, burial in Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri.

She married JAMES W. FAIRMAN on 26 June 1884 in Adams Co Illinois.   The son of Chauncey Fairman and his wife Eleanor Jane of Canada, he was born March 1859 in Missouri, and died before 1910, probably in Adams Co Illinois.
06-07 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 1, Adams Co Illinois  pg 7b   #511/137/159: Married 16 years, 2 children born, 2 living:   J.W. Fairman, 41, born March 1859, MO, CAN, NY, Ella M. Fairman, wife, 38, born September 1861, IL,  NY, IL, Robt. Fairman, son 14, born January 1886, MO, Evelyn J. Fairman, daughter, 9, born June 1890, IL, Lee T. Wehkamp, servant, 28, born January 1872, IL    Census Image
22 April 1910, Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri  pg 7b   #3015/208/229:   Widowed, 2 children born, 2 living: E. M. Fairman, 47, IL, NY, IL, J.R. Fairman, son, 24, MO, E.J. Quigg, daughter, 19, IL, F.J. Quigg, son-in-law, 29, IA [married 1 year], and several boarders       Census Image
In 1920, Ella, age 57, is living with her son, James Robert in Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri.   I was unable to locate her in a 1930 census.
Children of James Fairman and Ella Barlow are:
24 i.
JAMES ROBERT FAIRMAN4, born January 1886 in Missouri. 
25 ii.
EVELYN JANE FAIRMAN, born 08 June 1890 in Illinois, and died 24 December 1978 in Naples, Collier Co Florida.
 
15.
EMILY L. BARLOW3, (Joseph2, Jonathan1), was born February 1866 in Illinois, and died after 1930

She married JOHN OLIVER GLENN on 14 April 1886 in Adams Co Illinois.  The son of John G. Glenn and Harriet Louise Bliss, he was born December 1860 in Ohio, and died after 1930
07 June 1900, Quincy, Ward 1, Adams Co Illinois  pg 8a   #809/143/160:  Evelyne S. Barlow, widow, 9 children born, 4 living, 62, born August 1837, IL, MA, KY, Emily Glenn, daughter, 34, born February 1866, IL, OH, IL, Oliver J. Glenn, son-in-law, age 38, born December 1860, OH, OH, OH, Arthur B. Glenn, grandson, 13, born April 1887, IL, Jeanette Shelton, servant, 23, born October 1876, MO   Census Image
18 April 1910, Quincy, Ward 1, Adams Co Illinois   pg 3b  #809/63/65:  Married 24 years, 1 child born, 1 living:  John O. Glenn, 56, OH, OH, OH, Emily L. Glenn, wife, 44, IL, NY, IL, Arthur B. Glenn, son, 23, IL, Elizabeth Wehrkamp, servant, 38, IL        Census Image
05 January 1920, Quincy, Ward 7, Adams Co Illinois    pg 3b   #241/91/80:   J.O. Glen, 66, OH, PA, MD, Emily Glen, wife, 52, IL, PA, IL    Census Image
03 April 1930, Quincy, Adams Co Illinois   pg 1b  #241/17/19:   John O. Glenn, 76, OH, PA, NH, Emily L. Glenn, wife, 64, IL, NY, IL  #20:  Harriet L. Glenn, 80, OH, PA, NH, Adelicia Glenn, sister of Harriet, 77, OH, PA, NH      Census Image
26 i.
ARTHUR BARLOW GLENN4, born 09 April 1887 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, and died 09 October 1962 in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co Ohio.
GENERATION 4
16.
MARGARET DICKSON BARLOW4, (Stephen3, Stephen2, Jonathan1) was born 03 January 1886 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died 09 July 1980 in San Mateo Co California.

She married FREDERICK PUTNAM COWDIN c1913, probably in Illinois.  The son of Charles Henry Cowdin and Minnie A. Perowski, he was born 15 February 1884 in Illinois, and died 15 June 1970 in Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois.     WWI Draft Registration    WWII Draft Registration
08 January 1920, Springfield, Sangamon Co Illinois   pg 4b  #614/61/86:  Frederick P. Cowdin, 36, IL, GER, IL, Margaret B. Cowdin, wife, 34, Lucy F. Cowdin, daughter, 1 year, 10 mo, IL, Mary R. Steinritz, maid, 44, IL   Census Image
08 April 1930, Woodside, Sangamon Co Illinois   pg 8a  #1900/122/122:  Fred P. Cowdin, 47, IL, IL, GER, Margaret B. Cowdin, wife, 44, MO, MO, VA, Lucy Francis Cowdin, daughter, 12, IL, Soula Barlow, mother-in-law, widowed, 76, VA, VA, VA, Mary L. Hahn, lodger, 38, IL, Edith Sarff, servant, 37, IL   Census Image
Child of Fred Cowdin and Margaret Barlow is:
i. LUCY FRANCES COWDIN5, born c1919 in Illinois
 
17.
LUCY BARLOW TURNER4, (Margaret3, Stephen2, Jonathan1) was born 09 September 1871 in St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri, and died March 1948, burial in Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, St. Louis, St Louis, Missouri.

She married DUNCAN JOY on 28 March 1894.   The son of Levi Joy and Mary Frances Hill, he was born 14 March 1867 in Tennessee, and died 22 September 1928 in New York, burial in Calvary Cemetery and Mausoleum, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri.
08 June 1900, St Louis, St Louis Missouri   pg 11a  #4468/148/161:  Married 6 years, 2 children born, 2 living:  Duncan Joy, 33, born March 1867, TN, TN, TN, Lucy Turner, wife, 28, born September 1871, MO, MO, MO, Turner Joy, son, 5, born February 1895, MO, Mary F. Joy, daughter, 3, born January 1897, MO, Maggie Moore, servant, 29, born Decmeber 1870, IL, Ellen O. Callahan, servant, 43, born January 1856, IRE      Census Image
16 April 1910, Rye, Westchester Co New York     pg 31  #41/46:  Married 16 years, 2 children born, 2 living:   Duncan Joy, 42, TN, TN, TN, Lucy Joy, wife, 38, MO, MO, NY, Turner Joy, son, 15, MO, Mary F. Joy, daughter, 13, MO, Mary Quinn, servant, 40, IRE, Rose Henery, servant, 30, IRE   Census Image
I did not locate them in a 1920 or 1930 census, but they were on several passenger manifests that showed travel to France and England.
Children of Duncan Joy and Lucy Turner is:
i.
CHARLES TURNER JOY5, born 17 February 1895 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died 06 June 1956 in San Diego, San Diego Co California.  He graduated from Annapolis in 1916 and served in World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. During Korea, Rear Admiral Charles Turner Joy served as Commander of Naval Forces, Far East. After he passed away in 1956, a destroyer was named after him. The USS Turner Joy, served the nation proudly until it was decommissioned in 1982.
He married MARTHA ANN CHESS on 16 October 1924. She was born 08 September 1898 in Pennsylvania, and died 22 October 1978 in LaJolla, San Diego Co California.
Dictionary of American Biography, Supplement 6: 1956-1960. American Council of Learned Societies, 1980.
BIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY
Joy, Charles Turner (Feb. 17, 1895 - June 6, 1956), naval officer, was born in St. Louis, Mo., the son of Duncan Joy, a prosperous cotton broker, and Lucy Barlow Turner. Joy was educated at private secondary schools prior to entering the U.S. Naval Academy in 1912. He was graduated and commissioned ensign in 1916.
Joy first served in the battleship Pennsylvania, which became the flagship of the Atlantic Fleet and late in 1918 escorted the ship carrying President Woodrow Wilson to the Paris Peace Conference. In 1921 he was selected for the navy's elite postgraduate program in ordnance engineering. He continued that course for the next two years at various places, including the University of Michigan, from which he received the M.S. in 1922. During 1923-1925, as a lieutenant, he had his first duty in the Far East, serving on the staff of the commander of the Yangtze Patrol. On Oct. 16, 1924, Joy married Martha Ann Chess; they had three children.
Over the next seventeen years Joy served at sea as the executive officer of destroyer Pope and assistant gunnery officer in battleship California, and on the staff of the commander of destroyers, Battle Force. His first command was of the destroyer Litchfield in 1933-1935. These tours alternated with shore billets in his ordnance specialty, including assignments in the aviation ordnance section of the Bureau of Ordnance, the Naval Mine Depot at Yorktown, Va., and the ordnance and gunnery department at the Naval Academy.
In 1941-1942, Joy served in the Pacific on board the cruiser Indianapolis and later the carrier Lexington as operations officer for the commander of the Scouting Force. Despite the alleged battleship orientation of the gunnery specialists, Joy was decorated early in the war for planning successful carrier task force engagements with Japanese forces near Rabaul and New Guinea. Later in 1942 he took command of the cruiser Louisville, which subsequently saw combat in the Solomons and Aleutians campaigns.
From August 1943 to April 1944, Joy headed the Pacific Plans Division in the Washington headquarters of the Navy. At the end of that tour he was promoted to rear admiral and returned to the combat zone as commander of Cruiser Division 6. During the next year Joy participated in virtually all of the major operations marking the American advance across the Pacific, including the Marianas campaign, the recapture of the Philippines, the seizure of Iwo Jima and Okinawa, and fast carrier task force raids against other Japanese positions. His forces were noted for their effective shore bombardment and antiaircraft gunnery.
Near the end of World War II, Joy commanded Amphibious Group 2, which was preparing for the invasion of Japan. Detached in September 1945, he proceeded to China, where for the next eight months he commanded Task Force 73 and later Task Force 74 operating in the Yangtze River and from Hong Kong. These units cleared mines, transported Chinese troops reoccupying Japanese positions, and undertook other postwar operations. From 1946 to 1949, Joy resumed his ordnance specialty as commander of the Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren, Va., which tested and assisted in the development of new naval ordnance.
In August 1949, Joy was promoted to vice admiral and appointed commander of the U.S. Naval Force, Far East, with headquarters in Tokyo. Upon the outbreak of the Korean War in June 1950, he became the Allied naval commander for that conflict. His ships landed Allied troops in the war zone and supported them with supplies, gunfire, and carrier air strikes; blockaded North Korea; undertook mine-sweeping; and patrolled the Taiwan Straits to prevent hostile action between mainland China and Taiwan. Joy was a key leader in the highly successful Inchon landing of September 1950. By November 1950 he commanded 400 Allied and American ships.
For ten months after July 1951, Joy additionally served as the senior United Nations delegate at the Korean Armistice Conference held at Kaesong and, later, Panmunjom. For his role in these almost daily negotiations, Joy received worldwide notice for his calm, tenacious, but fruitless efforts to achieve a cease-fire agreement. He asked to be relieved of his assignment in May 1952. Following the Korean armistice of 1953, he wrote How Communists Negotiate (1955). Joy concluded that only the "imminent threat of application of our military power" would compel Communist governments throughout the world to "negotiate seriously." He wrote that the "greatest single influence on the Korean armistice negotiations was the failure of the United States to take punitive action" against China following its entry into the conflict. Because of the failure of American will to seek military victory, Joy believed that the 1953 armistice represented a triumph for mainland China.
Joy served as superintendent of the Naval Academy from 1952 to 1954, then retired with the rank of admiral. He died in San Diego, Calif.
The career of this reserved, modest, and thoroughly competent naval officer was notable for its versatility. He was a highly effective operational commander and planner who displayed flexibility in integrating new air and amphibious tactics into the fleet. He made significant contributions as an ordnance specialist. Finally, in his role as negotiator and through his writings on the relationship of force and diplomacy, Joy was an important figure in the history of American foreign relations in the period after World War II.
-- Dean C. Allard
FURTHER READINGS
[The Navy biographical file and collection of Joy's papers, relating especially to the armistice talks, are in the Operational Archives of the Naval History Division, Washington, D.C. Joy's diaries from the period of the armistice talks are at the Hoover Institution, Stanford, Calif. These documents have been edited by Allan E. Goodman as Negotiating While Fighting (1978). See also Samuel Eliot Morison, History of the United States Naval Operations in World War II, 15 vols. (1947-1962); Malcolm W. Cagle and Frank A. Manson, The Sea War in Korea (1957); and James A. Field, Jr., History of United States Naval Operations, Korea (1962).]
ii. MARY FRANCES JOY, born 25 January 1897 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died October 1993 in Virginia.
 
18.
CHARLES 'HUNT' TURNER, JR.4, (Lucy3, Stephen2, Jonathan1), was born 03 January 1874 or 1875 in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, and died 06 October 1934.    WWI Draft Registration

He married MARGARET FLORENCE O'FALLEN on 11 November 1899 in St. Louis, St Louis Missouri.   The daughter of Benjamin O'Fallon and Mary Shreve Carter, she was born 11 April 1875 in Florence Italy while her mother was visiting there.
03 July 1900, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri    pg 5a    #4220/274/299:  Married 1 year, 0 children:  Hunt Turner, 26, born January 1874, MO, MO, MO, Margaret Turner, wife, 25, Italy, NY, MO, Mary Malone, servant, 23, born September 1877, MO, Catherine Murphy, servant, 37, born February 1863, MO   Census Image
15 April 1910, St Louis, St Louis Missouri   pg 6b     ##4468/98/116:   Married 10 years, 2 children born, 2 living:  Charles H. Turner, 35, MO, MO, MO, Florence O'F Turner, 35, Italy, MO, MO, Margaret C. Turner, daughter, 7, MO, Lucy A. Turner, daughter, 1 year, 5 mo, MO, Clara S. Smith, servant, 38, CAN, Katherine Stanton, servant, 25, IRE   Census Image
05 January 1920, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri   pg 3a   #484/43/46:  Hunt C. Turner, 44, MO, MO, MO, Florence O'F Turner, 43, Italy, MO, MO, Margaret Turner, daughter, 17, MO, Lucy Turner, daughter, 11, MO, Alma Cushman, servant, 43, IL        Census Image
05 April 1930, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri   pg 3b  #55:  Chas. Hunt Turner, Jr., 55, MO, MO, MO, Florence Turner, wife, 55, Italy, MO, MO      Census Image
Children of Charles Turner and Margaret O'Fallen are:
i. MARGARETTE C. TURNER5, born 21 December 1902 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri     [Passenger list showing these girls dates of births]
ii. LUCY ANNE TURNER, born 28 November 1908 in Clayton, St Louis Co Missouri.      In 1930 she is living in the Locke home in St Louis.
 
19.
AGNES 'MALLOTTE' HOUSER4, (Agnes3, Stephen2, Jonathan1), was born 03 January 1890 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died October 1967 in St Louis Missouri, and died October 1967 in Missouri.

She married SEARS L. LEHMANN on 12 February 1912 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri.   The son of Frederick William Lehmann and Minora Stark, he was born 22 July 1888 in Des Moines Township, Iowa, and died 02 May 1935 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri.
Passenger List giving birth dates of Mallotte and the boys.
Sears Lehmann
Frederick William Lehmann, father of Sears Lehmann, from Wikipedia:

Frederick William Lehmann (1853–1931) was a prominent American lawyer, statesman, United States Solicitor General, and rare book collector.
Biography
He was born February 28, 1853 in Prussia. His father Friedrich Wilhelm Lehmann emigrated to Cincinnati, Ohio, when Frederick was two, where he ruled the family with an iron hand. His mother Sophia died young.
At age 10, Frederick ran away from home forever. As a vagabond, selling newspapers, working on farms, and herding sheep, he wandered across the Midwest, rarely going to school. In his teens, at the urging of his fellow sheep men, he took the stump for presidential candidate Horace Greeley and gave his first political speech.
At 17 he worked as a farm-hand for Judge Epenetus Sears of Tabor, Iowa. Sears was impressed with the boy's ability and sent him to Tabor College, where he graduated in 1873. After "reading law" in his benefactor's office, Lehmann practiced in Tabor, Sidney, Nebraska City, and Des Moines, Iowa. He married Nora Stark of Indianola on December 23, 1879, and he represented the Wabash Railroad.
A noted orator, he was active in Iowa politics, including the election of Governor Horace Boies. In 1890 he moved with his family to St. Louis, Missouri and continued to represent the Wabash while building a general law practice. In 1908 he was elected president of the American Bar Association and served twice.
President William Howard Taft named Lehmann as United States Solicitor General in 1910. In the Supreme Court of the United States Lehmann established the right to tax corporation incomes. He considered national bank affiliates to be illegal. About Lehmann's oral arguments, Justice Louis Brandeis said: "He was so eloquent, you hated to rule against Lehmann; you felt as though you were ruling against God."
In 1912 he returned to practice law in St. Louis with his sons. In 1914, however, he and Justice Joseph Rucker Lamar represented the United States at the ABC Powers Conference in which Argentina, Brazil, and Chile mediated between the United States and Mexico on the Veracruz Incident. Cases in his private practice established the right of the Associated Press to news as intellectual property, and he secured the Telephone Company's right to valuation on reproduction cost less depreciation.
In 1918 he became counsel for the United States Railway Wage Commission. He supported the forced separation of investment banks, commercial banks and brokerages (a policy later implemented in the Glass–Steagall Act of 1933) quoting: "One man cannot serve two masters." He also vigorously opposed Prohibition.
Representing the U. S. government in the Supreme Court, he would "confess judgment", a practice in which the Solicitor General admits that the government has been wrong all along and just drops the case even when supported by a lower court's prior decision. Inscribed in the office rotunda of the Attorney General is Lehmann's famous saying: "The United States wins its point whenever justice is done its citizens in the courts."
Frederick Lehmann always refused to run for public office, especially at a party convention of the breakaway Gold Democrats (opposed to the Free Silver candidate William Jennings Bryan) in St. Louis which he chaired (being foreign-born, he could not run for President anyway), and he declined judgeships. In politics he was generally a Democrat, if sometimes a Gold Democrat. In 1909 he drafted the charter by which the City of St. Louis is still run today.
He was a founder of the St. Louis Art Museum and the State Historical Society of Missouri, president of the St. Louis Public Library, and a director of the St. Louis World's Fair (Louisiana Purchase Exposition) of 1904, in which he was host of the Universal Congress of Jurists and Lawyers. He was a bibliophile and he collected rare first editions of Charles Dickens, Robert Burns and others, and artworks of Aubrey Beardsley, George Cruikshank and Thomas Rowlandson. He and industrialist William K. Bixby started the Burns Society; he was twice president of the University Club of St. Louis. He had a remarkable (possibly eidetic) memory --- when writer Henry James visited his house, Lehmann could recite whole works that James himself had written but forgotten. For most his life Lehmann was in demand as a public speaker, which he thoroughly enjoyed. His published works included: John Marshall (1901); The Lawyer in American History (1906); Abraham Lincoln (1908); Conservatism in Legal Procedure (1909); Prohibition (1910); and The Law and the Newspaper (1917).
In old age he auctioned off his rare book collections. He died September 12, 1931, aged 78, survived by his wife and three sons, lawyers Sears Lehmann, Frederick W. Lehmann, Jr., and John Stark Lehmann.
Three special collections at Olin Library, Washington University in St. Louis, include a selection of Lehmann's legal papers (including his time as Solicitor General), a collection of historic manuscript letters of notable people, and rare editions of works of Robert Burns and others. There is also a Frederick Lehmann Autograph Collection at the Missouri Historical Society, St. Louis.
Frederick W. Lehmann's house at No. 10 Benton Place in St. Louis is now preserved as the "Lehmann House" Bed and Breakfast.
“Queen Mary’s Lament” Autograph draft, 1791. 1 item (3 pp.). This draft of “Queen Mary’s Lament” is reproduced in facsimile in Poems and Letters in the Handwriting of Robert Burns (1908) in which it is noted that the original is in the possession of Frederick W. Lehmann. The poem later passed into the hands of his son, Sears L. Lehmann. The draft shows that the poem passed from Gilbert Burns, the poet’s brother, to James Gills of Edinburgh in 1814. The draft has been laminated and sewn into a stiff paper folder. Comparison with the facsimile cited above shows that the draft has been damaged since 1908. The leaves have become detached, the corners chipped, and pieces are broken from the top of both leaves. There are also tears in the folds and wax stains, one in blue, from the wax seal attached by Gilbert Burns.  Sears gifted the draft to the Washington University, St Louis Missouri.
24 January 1920, University, St Louis Missouri   pg 46a   #239/8890/1141:   Sears Lehmann, 38, IA, GER, IA, Malott Lehmann, wife, 30, MO, MD, MO, Sears Lehmann, son, 6, MO, ____ Lehmann, son, 1 mo, MO, Elizabeth Spillane, servant, 28, IRE     Census Image
08-09 April 1930, University, St Louis Missouri   pg 9a  #239/157/194:   Sears Lehmann, 49, IA, GER, IA, Malotte H. Lehmann, wife, MO, MD, MO, Sears Lehmann Jr., 17, MO, Frederick Lehmann III, MO, Bessie Gowin, servant, 29, IL, Bertha Hazelhofer, servant, 21, GER       Census Image
Children Sear Lehmann and Agnes Houser are: 
i SEARS LEHMANN5, born 02 April 1913 in St Louis Co Missouri, and died December 1978, SS issued in Pueblo, Pueblo Co Colorado.
ii. FREDERICK WILLIAM LEHMANN, born 24 December 1919 in St. Louis, St Louis Missouri, and died 21 February 2001 in St Louis Co Missouri.
 
20.
DOUGLAS BARLOW HOUSER4, (Agnes, Stephen, Jonathan), was born 28 August 1892 in St Louis, St Louis, Missouri, and died August 1966 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri       WWI Draft Registration

He married EMMA V. GARESCHE on 15 November 1916 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri. The daughter of Edmund A.B. Garesche and Emma Jennings, she was born 14 February 1895 in Missouri, and died 14 November 1980 in Ballwin, St Louis Co Missouri.
Centennial History of Missouri.

Douglas B. Houser, vice president of the St. Louis Globe-Democrat, was born in this city August 28, 1892, and is a son of the late Daniel M. Houser. The father was born in Washington county, Maryland, December 23, 1834, and was a son of Elias and Eliza Houser. He was a youth in his fifth year at the time of his parents' removal to Clark county, Missouri, whence they came to St. Louis in 1846. He had no educational advantages other than those afforded by the public schools and the year 1851, when he was sixteen years of age, saw him facing the problems of the business world with a career of success or failure before him, as he should make it.
His first service was in a humble capacity in the workrooms of the Union, a newspaper which was merged into the Missouri Democrat upon its purchase by the firm of Hill & McKee. The history of its evolution is contained elsewhere in this volume. It is inseparably interwoven with the annals of St. Louis and its record omitted from history's pages would leave but a garbled version of growth and development here. Marshall Field, master of finance and merchant prince, gave this advice to young men: "Try always to be ahead of your position and increase your efficiency." Although the words were not uttered at the time of Mr. Houser's early connection with the Globe-Democrat, the spirit was his in his embryonic business career.
He won his promotions and they signified a recognition of his general worthiness and specific business ability. He had been with the paper but a few years when he became bookkeeper and afterward general business manager. About the time he attained his majority Francis P. Blair purchased the interest of the senior partner in the Democrat and following his retirement from connection with the paper Daniel M. Houser acquired a pecuniary interest. At that day even the most progressive newspaper had but a comparatively small equipment, its presses and other office accessories being of the most crude character as compared with those of the present day. Mr. Houser stood in the position of leadership in the west in the advance which has particularly revolutionized the newspaper business until the journal of today is in touch with every section of the globe and presents every subject, as news items or in discussion that is of any interest to classes or to the general public. While the paper has kept abreast with the times in its search for matters of presentation through its columns the work of the office has been carried on in the most systematic manner every detail carefully watched with no loss of time or labor, so that maximum results are obtained by minimum effort, which is the secret of all real success.
Mr. Houser succeeded to the presidency of the Globe Printing Company upon the death of his predecessor Mr. McKee. He was for many years a director of the Western Associated Press and shared with Richard Smith, W. N. Haldeman, Murat Halstead, Joseph Medill and other well known newspaper men in planning the operation that has resulted in giving to the public the journal of today, which is a combination of the magazine and the newspaper. There was no work, movement or measure of vital interest to the city which did not elicit the attention of Mr. Houser and all such which his judgment endorsed as beneficial or progressive received his personal cooperation as well as his journalistic support. It was therefore to be expected that he would be among the first to father the interests of St. Louis in connection with an exposition project and he became one of the incorporators and original directors of the St. Louis Exposition, contributing in substantial measure to the success of that great fair. Entirely free from ostentation, there was about him neither the least shadow of mock modesty. He was a gentleman of fine address and thorough culture, whose citizenship was a synonym for patriotism and whose business career was characterized no less for the integrity of its methods than for its progressiveness and its success. He was honored not only on account of the enviable position which he occupied in journalistic circles but also because of the many kindly deeds of his life, which were ever quietly and unostentatiously performed.
His death occurred October 10, 1915, when he had reached the venerable age of eighty years.
It was in 1862 that Daniel M. Houser was married to Miss Margaret Ingram, of St. Louis, and they became the parents of two sons and a daughter, Mrs. W.I. Aderton, of St. Louis. The wife and mother passed away in February, 1880, and nine years later Mr. Houser married Miss Agnes Barlow, a daughter of Stephen D. Barlow. She had reached the age of forty-six years when she was called to her final rest on the 12th of May, 1907. She left three children: Agnes Malotte, the wife of Sears Lehmann, a son of Frederick W. Lehmann; Douglas B., of this review; and Duncan P.
Douglas B. Houser was educated in Smith Academy of St. Louis and at Yale University from which he won his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1914. Following his graduation he entered the service of the Globe-Democrat as a reporter and from that position worked his way upward to the editorial and business department and in December, 1918, was elected vice president of the company. This advancement has marked his gradual progress and developing experience in the newspaper field through many years. He has done with thoroughness everything he has undertaken and is today an executive officer of one of the great dailies of the country.
In St. Louis, on the 15th of November, 1916, Mr. Houser was married to Miss Emma Garesche, a daughter of E. A. B. and Emma (Jennings) Garesche, the former a prominent attorney of St. Louis. Mr. and Mrs. Houser have a daughter, Nancy Malotte, who was born September 8, 1918, and a son, D. B. Houser, Jr., born March 6, 1920, in St. Louis.
During the World war Douglas B. Houser served as corporal of Company G of the First Regiment of the Missouri Home Guard. His brother, Duncan Houser, served in the United States navy, which he joined as an ensign and was advanced to the rank of junior lieutenant. He served on a convoy and also on the ship that conveyed Secretary of War Baker to France. In his political views Douglas B. Houser is a stalwart republican, having given unfaltering allegiance It the party since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. In his college days he became a member of the Alpha Delta Phi. He is prominently known in the club circles of St. Louis, belonging to the University, Racquet, St. Louis and Advertising Clubs. He is also connected with the Chamber of Commerce and cooperates most heartily in all those activities which have to do with the city's development, the extension of its trade relations and the maintenance of high civic standards. An Episcopalian in religious faith he is a communicant of St. Peter's church. He belongs to one of the old, prominent and honored families of St. Louis and following in his father's footsteps has made for himself an enviable position in journalistic circles of the Mississippi valley.
03 January 1920, St Louis, St Louis, Missouri    pg 3a  #57:  Douglas Houser, 27, MO, MO, MO, Emma Houser, wife, 24, MO, MO, MO, Nancy Houser, daughter, 1 year, 3 mo, MO, Elizabeth Renn, servant, 34, MO, Mary Vairol, servant, 20, MO   Census Image
11 April 1930, Clayton, St Louis Co Missouri   pg 14a  #6470/232/337:    Douglas Houser, 37, MO, MO, MO, Emma Houser, wife, 35, MO, MO, MO, Nance Houser, daughter, 11, MO, Douglas Houser, son, 10 MO, Jane Houser, daughter, 8, MO, Emma Meyer, servant, 34, MO, Mary McNamee, servant, 20, MO   Census Image
Children of Douglas Barlow Houser and Emma Garesche are:
i. NANCY MALOTTE HOUSER5, born 08 September 1918 in St Louis Co Missouri.  She married GEORGE HALL
ii.
DOUGLAS BARLOW HOUSER, JR., born 06 March 1920, in St. Louis Co Missouri, and died 20 July 1999 in Douglas, Allegan Co Michigan, burial in Riverside Cemetery, Saugatuck, Allegan Co Michigan.   MAJ US MARINE CORPS WORLD WAR II        Tombstone Photo
He married DOROTHY.
Commercial Record:
Douglas B. Houser, 79, of Douglas, formerly of Wilmette, Ill., died Wednesday, July 21, 1999 at Holland Community Hospital.
Mr. Houser moved to the Douglas area in 1993, a Yale graduate in 1942. He was the president/owner of Houser Insurance Services, Inc. in Chicago, and was a majr in the U.S. Marine Corp., serving as a pilot during World War II.
Surviving are his wife, Dorothy; 10 children, Barcly and David Lencioni of Bridgeton, Mo., Nancy Houser and Andres Tzioumis of Newton, Mass., Stephen and Barbara Houser of Jupiter Fla., Peter Houser and Andrea Marchese of Seattle Wash., William Houser of Austin, Texas, Thomas and Barbara Houser of Beaverton, Ore., Edmond Houser of Springfield, Ill., Douglas and Michelle Houser of Chanhassen, Minn. and James Houser of Chicago, Ill.; nine grandchildren; one brother and his wife, James and Sue Houser of Town & Country, Mo., and two sisters and their husbands, Nancy and George Hall of St. Louis, Mo., and Jane and Henry Bell of Dallas, Texas.
Funeral services were held Friday, July 23, 1999 at 1 p.m. at Saugatuck Chapel, Dykstra Funeral Homes, the Rev. Corwin Stoppel officiating. Burial was in Riverside Cemetery.
iii. PETER HOUSER, born 11 February 1925 in St Louis Co Missouri, and died 05 February 1929 in St Louis Co Missouri
iv. JANE HOUSER, born c1928 in St Louis Co Missouri.  She married HENRY BELL
v. JAMES HOUSER married SUE
 
21.
DUNCAN PREWITT HOUSER4, (Agnes3, Stephen2, Jonathan1), was born 28 April 1894 in St Louis, St Louis Missouri.  Graduated class of 1916, Cornell University.  Enlisted 16A, US Navy, April 1917, LT (jg)    Photo 1: Duncan as a child       Photo 2  Passport photo with wife Maud Harris
He married 1) MAUD HARRIS.  She was born 16 November 1891 in Rochester, Monroe Co New York.      Passport Application, pg 1   - Passport Application, pg 2, for Duncan and Maud, Leaving May 12, 1921, New York, New York on the SS France, bound for France, England, Italy, Switzerland, Belgiu, Norway, Denmark, Spain, and Holland. Passenger List for Duncan and Maud H., leaving Cherbourg France, on the America, bound for New York, New York, arrival 08 April 1922, home address: Mississippi Valley Trust Co, St Louis, Missouri    Passenger List for Duncan and Maud leaving Le Havre France on the Ile de France, bound for New York, New York, arriving 15 November 1927, home in New York City.   Passenger List for Duncan,  Maud, and Mallot, leaving Le Havre France bound for New York, New York on the Ile de France, arriving New York, New York on 27 November 1929, home address:  Plaza Hotel, New York City, New York
He married 2)  ELIZABETH.  She was born February 17, 1893 in Providence, Providence Co Rhode Island. Passenger List for Duncan and wife, Elizabeth, boarding the Pennsylvania leaving New York, New York bound for Los Angeles California, arriving 05 March 1938
He married 2) EDNA MAE SHELTON on 26 August 1941 in Hillsboro, Jefferson Co Missouri.        Marriage License
Duncan Houser
Duncan and Maud Houser
22 January 1920, St Louis, Ward 25, St Louis Missouri pg 16b #11/229/308: Duncan P. Houser, 35, MO, MD, MO, a lodger in the home of George S. Tiffany, his occupation broker in stocks and bonds.    Census Image
02 April 1930, Providence, Providence Rhode Island pg 1a #303/4/4: Duncan P. Houser, 35, MO, MD, MO, Maud H. Houser, wife, 37, RI, RI, RI, Mallotte Houser, daughter, 2, NY, Hannah Patterson, lodger, 46, ENG, Metcalf S. Harris, friend, 79, RI         Census Image
Child of Duncan Houser and Maud Harris is:
i. MAUD MALLOTTE HOUSER5, born in New York City, New York.     She married JOHN ARMSTRONG HART in St Johns Co Florida
 
22.
WILLIAM CORNELIUS VOLK4, (CorneliusJr3, Martha2, Jonathan1), was born 14 August 1883 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois.     WWI Draft Registration

He married DAISY DEAN YEAST on 06 March 1907 in Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri.    Marriage License I believe she is the daughter of James William Yeast and Sarah Isabelle Willits but cannot locate the 1900 census to prove it. Daisy Dean is listed with them in a city directory of Yeast Clothing Co in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois in 1898-1902.   She shows her fathers birthplace as Pennsylvania, and James W. Yeast was in the 1850 census of Fayette Pennsylvania, age 3.
22 April 1910, St Louis, Ward 28, St Louis Missouri pg 10b #214: Married 3 years, 1 child born, 1 living:    William C. Volk, 26, IL, IL, MO, Daisy D. Volk, wife, 26, IL, PA, IL, Martha Volk, 1 yr, 9 mo, MO, Emma F. Volk, mother, 49, widowed, 2 children born, 1 living, MO, NY, NJ   Census Image 1   Census Image 2
07 January 1920, Edwardsville, Ward 4, Madison Co Illinois   pg 7b   #579/170/174:   C. William Volk, 36, IL, IL, MO, Daisy Volk, wife, 36, IL, US, US, Martha Volk, daughter, 11, MO, C. William Volk, son, 9, MO, W. James Volk, son, 3 yr, 8 mo, MO, F. Emma Volk, mother, 58, MO, NY, NJ    Census Image
This entire family disappeared before 1930, with the exception of Emma.
Known children of William Volk and Daisy Yeast are:
i. MARTHA VOLK5, born c1908 in Missouri
ii. WILLIAM CORNELIUS VOLK, born c1911 in Missouri
iii. JAMES W. VOLK, born c1916 in Missouri
Concidence??:  I find obituaries for William Cornelius Volk, Jr. and James William Volk both born in the 1930's, in Pennsylvania.
 
23.
MARION DOUGLAS VOLK4, (Stephen3, Emily, Jonathan1) was born 01 January 1888 in Minneapolis, Anoka Co Minnesota, and died 22 September 1973 in Windsor Co Vermont.      Photograph of Marion painted by her father in 1914 >

She married EZRA RALPH BRIDGE on 16 September 1913 in Center Lovell, Oxford Co Maine.  Marriage Record  The son of Charles Elvin Bridge and Nellie Prusia Silver, he was born 26 October 1885 in Dexter, Penobiscot Co Maine, and died 15 October 1968 in South Royalton, Windsor Co Vermont, burial in Broad Brook Cemetery, Sharon, Windsor Co Vermont.     Death Certificate     WWI 1st Lieut Ezra R. Bridge, Medical Div, U.S.A.
Ezra R. Bridge Marion Douglas Volk
15 January 1920, Pasadena, Los Angeles Co California pg 17a #1221/25/25: Esra R. Bridge, 34, ME, ME, ME, Marion Bridge, wife, 32, MN, MA, IL, Esra Bridge, son, 4 yr, 8 months, NY, Marion Bridge, daughter, 2, NY             Census Image
28 April 1930, Rochester, Monroe Co New York   pg 26b  #110/49/49:   Ezra A. Bridge, 33, ME, ME, ME, Marion Bridge, wife, 42, MN, MA, IL, Ezra V. Bridge, son, 15, NY, Shirley V. Bridge, daughter, 12, NY          Census Image
Children of Ezra Bridge and Marion Volk are:
i.
EZRA VOLK BRIDGE5, born 14 March 1915 in Rochester, Monroe Co New York, and died 20 January 1990 in Port Huron, St Clair Co Michigan.
He married VIRGINIA MAE JARDINE on 26 July 1939 in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw Co Michigan. The daughter of Edward Jardine and his Martha L. 'Mattie' Beach, she was born 04 February 1914 in Westville, LaPorte Co Indiana, and died 25 January 2004 in Fort Gratiot, St Clair Co Michigan.
PORT HURON -- Virginia J. Bridge, 89, died Sunday, January 25, 2004. Survived by her children Ezra, Cyrus, and Letitia Austin. Services: 11 a.m. Thursday, January 29, 2004 in the Smith Family Funeral Home, North Chapel, Port Huron. Visitation: 4 to 8 p.m. Wednesday, January 28, 2004 in the funeral home.
ii.
SHIRLEY / MARION BRIDGE / ANNA ADRIANOVA ANDAHAZY, born 1916 in New York, and died 30 November 1983 in Minneapolis, Hennepin Co Minnesota.
She married LORAND D. ANDAHAZY.

Women of Minnesota, Selection Biographical Essays by Barbara Stuhler, Gretchen V. Kreuter
ANNA ANDRIANOVA ANDAHAZY (Shirley Bridge) (Lorand D. Andahazy, ballerina, dance teacher, b. 1916, d. Nov. 30, 1983, Minneapolis. Member Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo before World War II; moved to Twin Cities, 1946; with husband opened Andahazy Choreographic School, St. Paul, and a second school in 1968; cofounder, director, principal dancer, Andahazy Ballet Borealis Co. of Minnesota. 1952-1970
Shirley Bridge
 
24. JAMES ROBERT FAIRMAN4, (Ella3, Joseph2, Jonathan1), was born January 1886 in Missouri.

He married BEULAH.
10 January 1920, Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri pg 8a #1214: James R. Fairman, age 33, MO, MO, IL, Beulah Fairman, wife, 33, CO, NY, WALES, Robert W. Fairman, son, CO, Ella N. Fairman, mother, 57, IL, NY, IL        Census Image  
I was unable to locate them in a 1930 census.
Known child of James Fairman and Beulah is:
i. ROBERT W. FAIRMAN5, born c1914 in Colorado
 
25.
EVELYN JANE FAIRMAN4, (Ella3, Joseph2, Jonathan1) was born 08 June 1890 in Illinois, and died 24 December 1978 in Naples, Collier Co Florida.

She married FRANK JAMES QUIGG.  The son of James Quigg and Julia Heisrodt, he was born 16 August 1881 in Pitcher Twp, Cherokee Co Iowa.  WWI Draft Registration 
14 January 1920, Minneapolis, Hennepin Co Minnesota   pg 12a  #4601/269/273:   Frank J. Quigg, 38, IA, NY, MI, Evaline Jane Quigg, wife, 29, IL, IL, IL, Martha J. Quigg, daughter, 8, MO         Census Image  
I was unable to locate them in a 1930 census.
Only known child of Frank Quigg and Evelyn Fairman is:
i. MARTHA JANE QUIGG5, born 13 July 1911 in Kansas City, Jackson Co Missouri, and died 25 January 1996 in Collier Co Florida.
She married EDGAR RAYMOND BEST.    He was born 18 November 1906, and died 06 January 1971 in Collier Co Florida
 
26.
ARTHUR BARLOW GLENN4, (Emily3, Joseph2, Jonathan1), was born 09 April 1887 in Quincy, Adams Co Illinois, and died 09 October 1962 in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co Ohio.

He married HELEN L. c1916, probably in Illinois. She was born 1893 in Missouri, and died 07 February 1959 in Cincinnati, Hamilton Co Ohio.
WWI Draft Registration      WWII Draft Registration shows him to be a disabled veteran, totally blind
Ohio Soldiers in WWI:  ARTHUR B. GLENN, Capt., White, 2312 Huxton Ave, Norwood Oh,, Br Quincy, Ill, Ap 9/87:  1 Lieutenant Engineers 29 July 1918 from Officers' Reserve Corps; Captain 6 May 1919. 22 Engineers to Discharge Fort Benj Harrison Ind; American Expeditionary Forces American Expeditionary Forces 21 Aug 1918 to 23 June 1919. Honorable discharge 9 July 1919, Citation May 21/19
16 January 1920, Cincinnati, Ward 3, Hamilton Co Ohio pg 12a Harris Family Hotel, #1322: Arthur B. Glenn, 32, IL, OH, IL, Helen L. Glenn, wife, 27, MO, OH, OH, Mary L. Glenn, daughter, 5 years, 2 mo, IL       Census Image
25 April 1930, Norwood, Hamilton Co Ohio pg 25a #3429/374/478: Arthur Glenn, 43, IL, OH, IL, Helen Glenn, wife, 37, MO, OH, OH, Mary L. Glenn, daughter, 15, IL, Jane A. Glenn, daughter, 9, OH          Census Image
Known children of Arthur Barlow and Helen L. are:
i. MARY L. GLENN, born c1915 in Illinois
ii. JANE A. GLENN, born c1921 in Ohio

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