Thomas Barlow
of Franklin Co New York


by Douglas T. Barlow --original transcript is in November 1995, Barlow of Barlow Newsletter--

Ivar, Jarl of the Uplanders, who lived in Norway in the eighth century, may be the first identifiable ancester of Thomas BARLOW. (Jarl means king, but a king in those days was any thug who could gather a few tough guys together to beat on some farmers for taxes.) Some of his descendents went with Rolf the Ganger around the year 900 to conquer Normandy and took the name d'Hauteville from territory they occupied.  Later some of the d'Hautevilles got territory near Le Havre called Habitot and they took the name d'Habitot. Some of the d'Habitots went with William the Conqueror to England in 1066, and one, Urso d'Habitot, got a lot of loot in the midlands, including the manor of  Barleie, or Barlow, in Derbyshire.

The d'Habitots of  Barlow started being called Barlow in the late twelfth or early thirteenth century, and they spread out to other parts of England.

Henry of Attercliffe, who called himself Barley and who died in 1589, had quite a few descendents in the Sheffield area, particularly the famous cutlers who made the Barlow knives. One of his descendents was a Lieutenant Colonel  William BARLOW (1710-1790) who served forty-six years in the army and retired to a place near Newton-in-the-Willows in Yorkshire. He was a younger son of a handed family who were wealthy enough to be able to spend the 2000 pounds or so to buy a Lieutenant Colonelcy for William. William had a son George, who had two sons, Thomas and John, another son who was a physician and a daughter who married a Lomax.

Thomas BARLOW was born around 1779 probably at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England, and was a son of George BARLOW. He died on June 07, 1878, at Hogansburgh, Franklin County, New York, and was buried there.

Thomas BARLOW was apprenticed in the weaving business, but he was more interested in building up control over other weavers by becoming an entrepreneur. He came to make a very tidy fortune for himself as a result of war prosperity in the Napoleonic Wars. In 1809 he married a sixteen year old girl named Elizabeth HEAP; he was about thirty. I think it highly probable that Thomas was from a family on the downgrade, because, although he was a weaver and illiterate, he was quite knowledgeable about business, and he had a brother who was a doctor and a brother-in-law who was quite well-to-do. Thomas had to have capital to build a mill and he probably made money by handling the business of other weavers.

After the war ended in 1815, things got much tougher. Thomas decided to take his capital and invest it in business in the United St ates, where he thought opportunities were better and restrictions not so severe. The rather harsh laws on emigration were lifted about 1825, so he set out to look over the possibilities. Eventually he decided on central New York near Utica in Oneida County where the newly completed Erie Canal was encouraging an infant cloth industry. In addition to setting up a home weaving business in Deerfield, near Utica, he built a mill, the first in the town according to a historical plaque erected by the state, and ran that for several years.

The mill was wiped out in 1832 by a spring flood. Accordingly, he went onto a farm near Marcy, Oneida County, and concentrated on weaving for four years until he had accumulated enough money to buy a place in northern New York. Thomas brought his family to America in 1827. His wife and seven children (the oldest was fifteen and the youngest was a babe in arms) left England in April and landed at New York City on July 18, 1827, traveling on the 450 ton ship Trident which carried 250 passengers, mostly emigrants.

In 1836, Thomas moved to Oswego County, New York, and it was from there that he bought a farm at Brasher, St. Lawrence County, New York, which was mostly wilderness. He sent his older sons to build it up first and they lived in a cabin on the bank of the river that ran through the property. They built a house, calling it "Bonnie Mount" after a home in England.  For awhile Thomas thought of staying in Oswego County and he sold "Bonnie Mount" to his brother John BARLOW in 1838. John had come to America at about the same time that Thomas did. But Thomas apparently changed his mind and he bought "Bonnie Mount" back in 1839 and moved his family into it. John moved to a nearby farm and later moved away from the area.  Thomas used modern agricultural methods which had been developed in England in the late 1700's to meet the ever increasing demand for food here but which were mostly unused in America because land was so plentiful. He and his sons made out very well farming when they had cleared most of their 189 acres. His sons worked the farm on shares and then went off on their own when they accumulated enough to do so.

Eventually, Thomas decided to cash in his accumulated capital and try milling again. In 1852 he moved to Hogansburgh in Franklin County and went into partnership with the Olivers in a gristmill. Later he was on his own. During the Civil War he made quite a tidy fortune in this, but things got tough again after the war and he lost most of what he had built up. Finally, in 1868, he sold "Bonnie Mount" to his son William who had been working it on shares. Thomas had built up capital in the Napoleonic Wars, lost it in 1832 in a flood, built it up again in the weaving business and put it into a farm, built it up again in milling during the Civil War and lost it again. In 1872 Thomas and his wife moved to North Lawrence in St. Lawrence County where his son-in-law Daniel HOAG had gone to run a store. In 1873, Elizabeth died there.

In January 1877, at 97, Thomas married a propertied widow named Charlotte TAGGART who claimed to be 100 years old. He hoodwinked her into thinking that he was wealthy and they made a will giving all their property to the survivor. But she was better at hoodwinking because she was really only fifty years old. He died in June 1878 at age 99 (his gravestone says he was 87) and all she got was a small house in North Lawrence. She lived another seven years, died in August 1885, and was buried next to her first husband Hugh TAGGART in the North Lawrence Cemetery.

Thomas and Elizabeth (Heap) BARLOW had eleven children:

i.
Mary BARLOW was born in 1810 at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England, and died in infancy.
2 ii.

John BARLOW was born on December 08, 1811, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.

iii.

Ann BARLOW was born on October 26, 1813, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
She died on August 22, 1860, at Scriba, Oswego County, New York, and was buried there in the North Scriba
Cemetery.
She married Henry QUONCE around 1835. He was born on September 10, 1804, and died on
December 18, 1865.

Their children were:

Eliza Ann QUONCE  Henry QUONCE  Charles QUONCE Albert QUONCE Maria QUONCE  Russell QUONCE

iv.

Eliza BARLOW was born on April 27, 1816, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
She died in 1896 at Aberdeen, Grays Harbor County, Washington.
She married Daniel HOAG
around 1835. He was born around 1814.

Their children were:

Martin HOAG     Mary Ann HOAG     Charles HOAG     Caroline Elizabeth HOAG     Josephine HOAG
Samuel HOAG
    Myra HOAG

3 v. William BARLOW was born on February 23, 1819, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
vi.

Mary BARLOW was born on July 24, 1821, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
She died on May 25, 1904, at Proctorsville, Windsor County, Vermont, and was buried in the Bombay, Franklin
County, New York, Cemetery. She was recorded with her parents at Brasher, New York, in the 1850 census.
She married Alexander SEARS around 1853. He was born in 1805 and died in 1884. He had married first
Samantha FISH and their children were: Mandana SEARS, who subsequently married Charles BARLOW, Clamana SEARS, Maritta SEARS, Henry SEARS and Samantha SEARS.

The children of Alexander and Mary (Barlow) were:

Elizabeth SEARS     Thomas SEARS (who died in infancy)     Eliza SEARS     Thomas SEARS     Mary SEARS     Addie SEARS

4 vii. Samuel BARLOW was born in 1823 at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
5 viii.

James BARLOW was born on February 18, 1826, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.

6 ix. Charles BARLOW was born on October 08, 1828, at Whitesboro, Oneida County, New York.
x.

Caroline BARLOW was born on August 23, 1831, at Deerfield, Oneida County, New York.
She married Gideon ST. DENIS on July 02, 1858, at Hogansburgh, Franklin County, New York.

He was born around 1838 and died in 1897. She died in 1920.

Their children were:

Rudolf ST. DENIS     Thomas ST. DENIS     Mary ST. DENIS

xi.

Elizabeth BARLOW was born on October 28, 1834, at Marcy, Oneida County, New York.
She married Julius ST. DENIS, Gideon's brother, around 1866.

She died on February 09, 1900, at Brasher Falls, New York, and was buried in the Brasher Falls Cemetery.

Their children were:

Josephine ST. DENIS     Caroline ST. DENIS     Annie ST. DENIS     Bertha ST. DENIS     Lillian ST. DENIS

Second Generation

2.

John BARLOW was born on December 08, 1811, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
He came to America with his mother in 1827, at which time he was listed as age 13 on the passenger list.
He remained with his parents until the 1840's when he married.

John BARLOW married Minerva JACOBS around 1840. She was born in 1808 in Vermont and she died in the 1850's. She had married first William JOHNSON who died around 1840, and their children were:

Charles JOHNSON     Jane JOHNSON     Olive JOHNSON

John and Minerva BARLOW had no children.

John BARLOW had an 108 acre piece of property which he bought from the Alexander Brodie estate for $651 in 1865. His step-son Charles JOHNSON lived with him for a long time and later his brother William's son Ira. In his last years he lived with his brother William and when he died in 1884 at Brasher, New York, he willed his property to either William or Ira. He was buried in the Barlow plot of the Carville Cemetery at Helena, St, Lawrence County, New York.

 

3.

William BARLOW was born on February 23, 1819, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
He came to America with his mother in 1827. He lived with his parents until he married, at which time he moved to
a hamlet called Dug Way in Oswego County, New York, where he started a cooperage business. In the 1850 census he was recorded as a farmer at Scriba in Oswego County. When his brother Samuel moved west around 1850-51, William probably moved back to the family homestead at Brasher. After 1854 when his father went into the milling business he ran the family farm himself and he was recorded there in the 1860 census. In 1868 he bought it from his father.

William BARLOW married Sarah SPRINGER around 1848 in Oswego County, New York.
She was born in 1829 in New York and she died in 1905.

William BARLOW died in 1900 at Brasher, New York. He, his family and his brother John were buried in the Barlow plot of the Carville Cemetery at Helena, New York, although there are no stones to mark their graves.

Their children were:

i. William BARLOW was born in 1849 and died in the 1860's.
ii. Ira BARLOW was born in 1850 and died in 1895.
iii. Sarah BARLOW was born in 1852 and died in the 1860's.
iv. Henry BARLOW was born in 1853 and died in the 1860's.
v. Jane Ann "Jen" BARLOW was born in 1854 and died in the 1930's.
vi. Edwin BARLOW was born in 1858 and died in the 1880's.
vii. Mary "Mame" BARLOW was born in 1862 and died in the 1930's.
viii. Abigail BARLOW was born in 1867 and died in the 1900's.

 

4.

Samuel BARLOW was born on November 6, 1823, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
He came to  America with his mother in 1827, at which time he was listed as age 3 on the passenger list.

He remained with his parents until about 1848 when he went to Chicago, Illinois, to try his hand in the clothing business.

In 1849 he ran a restaurant and saloon at Toledo, Ohio, and about 1850 he was in New Orleans, Louisiana.
About 1852 he went to California and subsequently he was in Oregon in the mining business, all according to his account of his life in the History of St. Lawrence County. However, he was recorded in the 1850 census as a farmer and living with his parents at Brasher, New York. In 1853 he returned to Brasher, reputedly with a fortune of $50,000.

In 1854 he married and purchased a farm from Avery Campbell. He was, however, mostly a gentleman farmer because his main interest was with a mercantile establishment in Hogansburgh.

From 1866 to 1870 he operated a gristmill and sawmill, which he had purchased from his father for $10,000. He subsequently sold this mill to Mills and Folsom for $11,000.

Sometime about 1880 Samuel BARLOW built the big house on the corner in Hogansburgh, but apparently he did not live there very much. He made trips to California, twenty-three according to family tradition. He gave a small place in  Brasher Falls to his impoverished sister Elizabeth ST. DENIS and he sold most of his eastern property, his 264 acre farm and other land acquired from tax sales, in the 1880's or 1890's.

Samuel and his brother James were fairly close. They were together at Chicago and in California. Each named his oldest son after the other. Samuel stopped many times on his transcontinental trips to visit James, a fact remembered vividly by James' grandchildren, who lived and grew up with him.

Samuel and his older brother William were great sporting men; they used to take off for a week or two at a time and the rest of the family never knew where.

Samuel BARLOW married Martha McELWAIN in April 1854 at Brasher Falls, New York. She was born in 1825 in New York and was a daughter of John and Martha (McCarter) McELWAIN.

Samuel BARLOW died in 1907.

Their children were:

i. James BARLOW was born in 1855 and died in the 1930's.
ii. Allison BARLOW was born in 1857 and died in the 1940's.
iii. Lyman BARLOW was born in 1858 and died on July 15, 1871.
iv. Martha Etta BARLOW  was born in 1863 and died in the 1900's. 

5.

James BARLOW was born on February 18, 1826, at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England.
He came to America with his mother in 1827, at which time he was listed as age 1 on the passenger list.

Family legend has it that James got into trouble with a girl. He deserted her and went west, possibly with his brother
Samuel about 1848.

James BARLOW's first marriage was to a girl whose name is believed to be Margaret HUTCHENS.
They had no children.

James married second Mary Ann EGAN. She was born in 1832 in Canada and she died in 1882.

Supposedly James deserted her as soon as he could and ran off to California, where he stayed for seven years. But he came back around 1858 and settled at St. Paul, Minnesota, where his wife had gone to be with
her family. He hauled timber, worked a farm and later ran a boarding house.  About 1880 he apparently borrowed money from Samuel and bought a 135 acre farm that he lived on until his death.  He was not a particularly good farmer and he never finished his farm house.  He dealt in land options for awhile but was usually in debt.

James BARLOW died in 1910 at St. Paul, Minnesota, and was buried in the Mounds View Cemetery in Ramsey County, Minnesota.

James' and Mary Ann's children were:

i. Elizabeth BARLOW was born on February 18, 1850, probably at Troy, New York.
She married James MARSHALL, the son of William and Mary Ann MARSHALL, on January 18, 1868.

She died on February 11, 1903, at Athelstane, Marinette County, Wisconsin.
ii. Charlotte BARLOW was born in 1861 and died in 1876.
iii. Samuel BARLOW was born in 1865 and died in 1939.
iv. Karon BARLOW was born in 1869 and died in 1948.
v. Ambrose "Frank" BARLOW was born in 1874 and died in 1949.

 

6.

Charles BARLOW was born on October 08, 1828, at Whitesboro, Oneida County, New York.
Charles helped to run the homestead farm until sometime in the 1850's when he apparently rented an 82 acre farm from Alexander Brodie. He bought this farm from the Brodie estate in 1861 for $365. In 1864 he bought a 48 acre
"back lot" from Asa Mason for $1140 and in 1868 he bought the 65 acre Francis McGee plot from his brother Samuel for $2369. He avoided going into the service during the Civil War by paying for a substitute.

Sometime around 1872 he seriously injured one arm and suffered from the pain of it ever after. In the late 1880's he went to Virginia for awhile with his son Alexander and then subsequently started buying up land in the "hard scrabble" area. He started to make brick, using the clay from his purchased land, but that venture fell through because the clay wouldn't make good brick.

In 1895 Charles sold his farm for $6500 to Henry Lantry and purchased a store and saloon at Brasher Iron Works, a small settlement north of Helena.  Unfortunately, he was his own best customer. He became involved in further land buying schemes and eventually ended up with over 600 acres in the area of Brasher Center and Brasher Iron Works -mostly the most worthless land imaginable.

Charles BARLOW married Mandana SEARS, his sister Mary's stepdaughter, on March 13, 1858.
She was born in 1839 and died in 1910. She was the daughter of Alexander SEARS from his first marriage.

Charles BARLOW died on July 04, 1906, at Brasher, New York, and was buried in the Hillside Rest Cemetery at Bombay, New York.

Charles' and Mandana's children were:

i. Alexander BARLOW was born in 1859 and died in 1947.
ii. Charles BARLOW was born in 1862 and died in 1930.
iii. Mary BARLOW was born in 1864 and died in 1933.
iv. Maritta BARLOW was born in 1867 and died in the 1950's.
v. infant, died in infancy.
vi. Samuel BARLOW was born in 1873 and died around 1938.
vii. Thomas BARLOW was born in 1875 and died in the 1880's.
viii. Annie BARLOW was born in 1880 and died in infancy.
ix. Elizabeth BARLOW died in infancy.


The Descendants of  Thomas Barlow of Brasher, Franklin Co New York
Born at Newton-in-the-Willows, Yorkshire, England
Compiled by Edson Barlow
Generation

1         2         3         4         5         6         7         8

Thomas Barlow, 160 (c1779-1878)

Mary Barlow (1810-dy)

John Barlow (1811-1884)

o
Ann Barlow (1813-1860)

Eliza Barlow (1816-1896)

William Barlow (1819-1900)

William Barlow (1849-1860)

Ira Barlow (1850-1895)

Sarah Barlow (1852-c1865)

Henry Barlow (1853-c1865)

Jane Ann Barlow (1854-c1935)

Edwin Barlow (1858-c1885)

Mary Barlow (1862-c1935)

Abigail Barlow (1867-c1905)

Mary Barlow (1821-1904)

Samuel Barlow (1823-1907)

James Barlow (1855-c1935)

Allison Barlow (1857-c1945)

Lyman Barlow (1858-1871)

Martha Etta Barlow (1863-c1905)

James Barlow (1826-1910)
Elizabeth Barlow (1850-1903)

Charlotte Barlow (1861-1876)

Samuel Barlow (1865-1939)

Karon Barlow (1869-1948)

Ambrose "Frank" Barlow (1874-1949)

Charles Barlow (1828-1906)
Alexander Barlow (1859-1947)

Charles Barlow (1862-1930)

Mary Barlow (1864-1933)

Maritta Barlow (1867-c1955)

Ann Barlow (1870-dy)

Samuel Barlow (1872-1938)

Thomas Barlow (1875-c1885)

Annie Barlow (1880-dy)

Elizabeth Barlow (dy)

Caroline Barlow (1831-1920)

Elizabeth Barlow (1834-1900)

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